Amerika

Furthest Right

What Reparations May Look Like


by Bjorn Jansson

With Harvard University making noises about reparations for Blacks because of its historical involvement with slavery, race realists should expect a full-scale push for slavery reparations at the federal level within the next few years. Slavery remains both the enigma and elephant in the room for the political left and right of our nation.

Imagine you believe slavery is inherently immoral. Perhaps you were told that slavery was a unique institution created by Whites to oppress you, and that your economic misery today is caused by slavery in the past. In this scenario, American culture and government have stated that Whites live and thrive on stolen blood money made off the backs of your people. Would you wait for a check in the mail from the White man, or would you rise up and take your money back the old fashioned way?

If you imagined this, I can only think you would pick the second option, because who in their right mind, after their entire surrounding culture both confirms and admits to building a civilization off of your ancestors’ stolen slave labor, would trust that same culture to repair the damages? Who among us wouldn’t be irate to believe that every single socioeconomic disadvantage we experience is now openly admitted and confirmed by the culture to be a remnant of its historical misdeeds?

This is the coming ethical dilemma of Blacks in our nation, who, after being fed historical half-truths are just short of the confirmation and validation they need to take back what they believe is truly theirs. A national push for, or even conversation about, reparations would be all that this needed to ignite this.

The Left is aghast at slavery mostly because it lacks any convincing explanation for its existence, save a conspiracy theory. Similarly, the political Right shares this moral indignation because it sees slavery as anti-freedom. The difference is that the Right naively believes it can simultaneously condemn slavery and avoid a discussion on reparations.

Because no positive moral explanation for slavery exists today, the continued bipartisan moral outrage against historical slavery is more than enough to trump even the most sound economic arguments against reparations. The conservative dual condemnation of slavery yet denial of reparations is perceived as the ultimate gaslighting, which infuriates the political Left and makes it even more determined to condemn and eliminate all traces of slavery in contemporary culture.

Theoretically, were the political Right to cease condemning slavery as immoral, it would have a solid argument against reparations. If the political Right fails to offer a moral justification for slavery, the Left will continue to push for federal level reparations, which can only embolden blacks to take reparations into their own hands. But if the political right offers a moral justification for slavery — like the founding fathers, early American presidents, confederate leaders, and southern Baptists did — the result will be an unbearable culmination of the American cultural strife since the end of the civil war, which can only be abysmal.

Race realists must be prepared for a cultural conflict either way. To echo pro-slavery arguments as old America did 200 years ago would only confirm the political Left’s worst suspicions about the Right, but might also convince the two sides that separation is their only option. To allow discussions on reparation is to be complicit in their inevitable fulfillment, which has the backing of the major corporations, universities, government agencies, and elites.

If reparations remain unopposed, mere talk of its impending implementation is likely to create the most intense racial violence and ethnic unrest ever seen. By failing to discuss the moral and ethical dimension of historical slavery, even in opposing reparations, White Americans will effectively be surrendering to the rioting, looting, violent mob.

Tags: ,

|
Share on FacebookShare on RedditTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn