Amerika

Politics Under Diversity

America had several early diversity experiences, but most of them such as Amerinds and Africans were kept under wrap by both de facto and legally mandated segregation. The 1960s took care of the latter, and affirmative action shattered the former.

A more fundamental American diversity experience occurred when Southern/Eastern Europeans joined the previously wholly Western European population. This manifested in a number of changes, including the rise of diversity politics where these groups settled in large numbers.

In particular, cities like Chicago, which had high Irish and Polish populations, showed how groups from outside the West tended toward different systems of self-governance, specifically the strongman model that is common in the third world.

Generally, Southern and Eastern European countries do better with strong leaders and less rule of law or insistence on the lack of corruption that Western Europeans prefer. Consider Italy, Russia and Ireland as contrasted to England during the same time period.

In Chicago and New York, these new immigrant populations created the rise of machine politics:

City government experts point to a political culture that’s been in place for more than 100 years. This culture dates back to the late 19th century, when a gambling-house owner named Michael Cassius McDonald created the city’s first political machine. Under machine-style rule, those in power would hand out contracts, jobs, and social services in exchange for political support.

Chicago’s large immigrant population made it easier for political machines to grow in power. Poor ethnic communities could be played off against one another and manipulated with petty gifts. In exchange for political support, ethnicities would be given virtual fiefdoms within city government; the Irish, for example, were given police work, and the Italians jobs at the transit authority.

Of course, none of this was unique to Chicago. New York City had large immigrant populations and the notorious political machine at Tammany Hall. But machine politics faded away in New York, due in part to external pressure from former New Yorker Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who was elected president in 1932.

Did machine politics fade away, or were they simply transformed into the Leftist agenda upon which FDR embarked?

It definitely appears that the Left has assimilated the lessons from machine politics:

Chicago moved towards a one-party system that made it even more vulnerable to corruption: The city’s last Republican mayor left office in 1931. Today, not even the Democratic primaries are competitive—for the most part, once you’re in office, you stay there. The weak campaign finance laws in Illinois probably helped to stave off competition in recent years.

Diversity means that no social standards in common exist, and each ethnic group becomes a special interest group, which means they can be bought off like other special interest groups (minorities, religions, unions, LGBT+, industries, mothers against drunk driving, environmentalists) by giving them monopolies on certain roles.

At that point, the only sin is to violate the rules of the machine itself, which exists solely to further control, a system of power based on uniformity and power as a means-to-an-end of itself. Control necessarily arises from democracy as Plato detailed 2400 years ago.

Notice how similar that is to both the contemporary Leftists in the West and the Soviet Communists.

Apparently, the practice of machine politics is alive and well in Chicago today:

The Chicago Machine relies on unwritten rules to recruit new members and control existing ones. The machine’s unwritten rules are very similar to those of organized crime families and street gangs. Machine recruiters don’t hand new members a manual containing the rules. New machine members learn the organization’s customs and norms through their elders or by trial and error.

The machine relies on peer and social pressure to enforce its rules. The machine does not physically beat or murder those who violate the rules. Nonetheless, the machine metes out punishment including excommunication, loss of jobs, loss of contracts, public humiliation, or inspections that lead to hefty fines and loss of income. People who live in Chicago know why you “don’t fight City Hall.” If you dare challenge City Hall, the machine will apply its unlimited city resources to make you pay.

Machine members will tell you the machine doesn’t exist. It’s in the best interest of the machine to make you believe there is no such thing as a political machine. The machine doesn’t want voters like you to know there is a political organization manipulating your vote. The machine relies on votes from the unsuspecting public to manufacture patronage jobs, political power, campaign contributions, and income for members who make the machine’s candidates invincible at the polls.

When people join the Chicago political machine, they aren’t photographed and issued an identification card. The machine doesn’t require its members to periodically receive an updated identification card that says, “Chicago Machine Member since 2003.” The machine has no official dues, no official articles of incorporation, and no official meetings. The closest the machine gets to anything official is the Cook County and State of Illinois Democratic Party. The machine camouflages itself under the false pretense of a political party that exists to serve the public good.

The machine is strictly business. The machine doesn’t sell drugs or weapons. Its stock and trade is political influence and power. The machine has control of city, county, and state taxes and often uses the money it collects as its own. At the very least, the machine’s elected officials trade government services for campaign contributions, which is why Jay Stone has sought a ban on political contributions from companies and people who do business with the city.

Everything the machine does is designed to get its members reelected so the machine can hold on to its political power and control government jobs and the taxes it collects. The machine is easy to get along with provided you play the machine’s game. If you ask members of the machine for help with problems concerning city, county, or state government, you can have it provided you help enough influential political machine members get what they want.

In other words, independent of the groups involved, the practice of diversity itself leads to thirdworlding, or the transfer of first world states to third world levels of order.

Diversity causes a wide range of negative impacts, but most fundamentally it destroys the identity and shared culture of a society leading to loss of social order and vanishing social trust, leading to civilization collapse.

Our future under diversity is more of the same, except that thanks to FDR, the Chicago/Tammany Hall model has gone nationwide through the proto-Communist Left wing of the United States.

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