Amerika

Archive for the ‘Realism’ Category

Modern Science Finds A Solution For 4Chan

Thursday, June 1st, 2017

Reeling from the assault of “weaponized autism” that has seen numerous Leftist schemes unraveled, modern science strikes back with an alleged cure for autism:

To the dismay of parents and practitioners, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported last year that the number of children with autism in the US had risen between 2000 and 2012 from one in 150 to one in 68. It’s no wonder that parents, medical professionals, and autism advocates are desperate to find something that can manage — or, better yet, cure — the disease.

Now researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have published a research article in the Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology that shows a tentative link between a 100-year old medication and improvements in children with autism.

Interestingly, the researchers claim that the drug interrupts a stuck cellular process. Cells under stress harden their membranes and cease or limit communication with other cells, creating a kind of shutdown metaphorically similar to the psychological effects of autism. By inhibiting extracellular ATP signaling, the drug Suramin gives cells the all-clear and they start interacting normally again.

While this is good news for the parents of autistic children, it cannot be long before it is prescribed as mandatory for right-wing commenters on the internet.

Deciphering The Egyptian DNA Puzzle

Thursday, June 1st, 2017

It is great when science confirms traditional wisdom. The net buzzes with discussion of a genetic study of ancient Egyptian mummies, following up on the the knowledge that parallel human evolution occurred in Europe (see contrarianism). But most have missed the point.

From the abstract:

The researchers discovered that ancient Egyptians closely resembled ancient and modern Near Eastern populations, especially those in the Levant, and had almost no DNA from sub-Saharan Africa. What’s more, the genetics of the mummies remained remarkably consistent even as different powers—including Nubians, Greeks, and Romans—conquered the empire.

Here we have an exercise in “hide the ball.” What is not being mentioned?

  1. Ancient Egyptians resembled modern Levantines. But who do modern Egyptians resemble?
  2. The mummies remained consistent despite occupations, but what about Egyptians as a whole?

We are — cleverly, so very cleverly — ducking the question of population change in Egypt. As a child, you too may have wondered why the Egyptians once built great monuments but now seem barely able to build a two-story house, and are known mainly for hopeless invasions of Israel and cuisine. What happened?

Luckily, National Geographic is willing to tell us something about modern Egyptian heritage:

This reference population is based on native Egyptians. As ancient populations first migrated from Africa, they passed first through northeast Africa to southwest Asia. The Northern Africa and Arabian components in Egypt are representative of that ancient migratory route, as well as later migrations from the Fertile Crescent back into Africa with the spread of agriculture over the past 10,000 years, and migrations in the seventh century with the spread of Islam from the Arabian Peninsula. The East African component likely reflects localized movement up the navigable Nile River, while the Southern Europe and Asia Minor components reflect the geographic and historical role of Egypt as a historical player in the economic and cultural growth across the Mediterranean region.

Modern Egyptians are 68% North African, 17% Arab, 4% Jewish, and 3% each from Asia Minor, East Africa and Southern Europe. In other words, while the mummies remained consistent, the population has not, which may explain why modern Egyptians do not do the things the ancient ones did.

Each population has a genetic profile based on centuries of adaptation, and these genes convey abilities and inclinations known as traits. By themselves, traits are rarely complete in the form we think of them, but when a profile is complete, different traits complement each other and produce the abilities, preferences and intuitive knowledge that we see in each population. Just as there is no single gene for intelligence, it takes many genes — like a net — to produce the effects we recognize as distinct to a population. When the genetic profile is disturbed by admixture, even trace admixture, then those abilities are lost.

In Egypt, we see a warning. Traditional wisdom was that as Egypt rose in power and wealth, people came from all over to be part of this civilization, and gradually replaced the original Egyptians with a group whose genetic net was disrupted and so lacked the abilities of the original. Originally it was thought that gradual absorption of Nubians shattered the Egyptian bloodline.

It turns out that the picture is more complex and delivers a more dire warning for us. The question is not what you mix with, but that you mix at all. Even trace admixed groups like Southern and Eastern Europeans, when mixed into another European group, can erase its genetic net and replace it with generic people lacking the original abilities.

What Is The Core Of Western Civilization?

Monday, May 22nd, 2017

As we embark on the lengthy process of declaring that Western Civilization went down a bad path and crashed, and realize that we must reboot it from the ashes, the question arises as to what the core of Western Civilization is.

Some, like Richard Spencer, identify this as “conquest,” or an extension of the Nietzschean duality of sensitivity and aggression. That makes sense. Others claim is the church, individuality, liberty or some other proxy for the good. Spencer is closer than those.

Around here, we refer to the core of the West as reflection, or the ability to mirror the outsider world in our inner selves, and to contemplate it with the transcendental purpose of understanding its ways and order so that we can adapt to them, and then improve our lot “qualitatively” by improving quality, goodness and accuracy in our thinking.

Another factor might be a transcendental frequently mentioned and commonly misunderstood, beauty. This means that life is made not on a utilitarian level, but to celebrate and enhance the goodness of life in everyday experience. These are things which lift us up and make us appreciate life in a renewed sensation that it might be holy or at least incomparable.

Roger Scruton writes in Country And Townhouse about the necessity of transcendental beauty:

Aged 14, quite by accident, I discovered the soul of Mozart. It was soon obvious to me that Mozart’s music contained a kind of knowledge that could never be obtained from a psychology textbook or even from a prayer book or sacred text. I made this knowledge my own – even though I could not tell you what it is, but only play it to you on the piano. But this knowledge guides me through life. Were the ability to respond to Mozart to be forgotten, I know that the world would be a much poorer place. We would have lost one avenue to the ‘knowledge of ends’. Those that have this knowledge will do whatever they can to perpetuate it. They will teach it to their children; they will put pressure on schools and universities to do the same. They will do this not for their own good but for the common good, knowing that something necessary to human life is at stake.

…As long as places and times exist where this can be done there is hope in the world. Wordsworth wrote that ‘getting and spending, we lay waste our powers’. But when we stand back from the mill of consumption and look on the turbulent waters with the eye of an artist, we are rested in our hearts and our powers are restored. People who do this are the friends of order in a world of entropy, for they see, in the depths of the swirling pool, the still point where meaning lies. They cannot describe what they see, and that is why the highest forms of art exist – not to describe the meaning, but to reveal it, as the loveliness of the world was revealed on that first imagined Sabbath.

The core of the West is found in this reflective outlook: to see the beauty of the world, to bring it to an apex of quality, and then to let it infuse us and guide us in all of our tasks, both exceptional and mundane.

Leftist Evolution Dogma Possibly Overturned

Monday, May 22nd, 2017

The Left has maintained a death-grip on academia and the sciences for some time now, but the mantle of ideological conformity is beginning to slip. It seems that the “Out of Africa” theory of human origins may not be as absolute as once thought:

Currently, most experts believe that our human lineage split from apes around seven million years ago in central Africa, where hominids remained for the next five million years before venturing further afield.

But two fossils of an ape-like creature which had human-like teeth have been found in Bulgaria and Greece, dating to 7.2 million years ago.

…The discovery of the creature, named Graecopithecus freybergi, and nicknameded ‘El Graeco’ by scientists, proves our ancestors were already starting to evolve in Europe 200,000 years before the earliest African hominid.

If the Leftists follow their usual game plan, there will be much fear/uncertainty/doubt spread about this idea in the coming weeks, followed by “alternate theories” based on the idea that these fossils were either wrongly dated, or consisted of animals which briefly ventured out of Africa during a warming spell and then went back to evolve into modern humanity.

Meditation For Übermenschen

Tuesday, May 16th, 2017

The alt-right is full of exhortations to self improvement. Lift weights! Do martial arts! Study science and math! But what of meditation?

Meditation is clearly beneficial to anyone attempting to survive among the ruins and improve themselves. Take a gander at this article named “This Is Your Brain On Meditation” from Stanford University:

Your brain tunes out the outer world during meditation, and on brain scans of meditators, scientists can see increased activity in default mode network – which is associated with better memory, goal setting, and self-awareness.

You want to rise up and turn the tide of Western decay. If you’re going to do that, you will need to put your mind in order and develop self-control, discipline and mental clarity. You have to focus. Rather than put together a reading list of books that none of you will buy, I’ve condensed everything that you need in order to get started into a nifty list. Pay attention and notice every word. Here’s how it works:

  1. Find a comfortable position in which you cannot fall asleep. As you progress in your practice, you will sit for longer and longer periods. Don’t bother getting the position perfect at the beginning, just comfortable enough to sit for ten minutes at the start. You will fidget and shift around at first. Trial and error are a big part of meditation, so you’ll need to refine your position as you go. Don’t bother doing full-lotus, unless you are already very flexible and like the position. Websearch “zafu” and “kneeling bench” to see some other options. Sitting in a chair works, but sit up straight so your chair doesn’t touch the back. This is about focus, paying attention, and noticing things.
  2. Begin with ten minutes and gradually increase your time. Figure out how long you can meditate and sit for five minutes longer than that. As soon as you notice that you’re comfortable, bump it up another five. Keep doing this until you’re up to an hour every day. This may take anywhere from a few months to a few years. You will notice it getting easier as time passes.
  3. Pick a focal point. You can concentrate on the feeling of breath in your nose, your chest rising and falling, the area just below your navel, the way your palms feel, or any other thing. Pick one and stick with it. You can count your breaths up to 10 repeatedly if you like. Different things work for different people. Experiment around for a few sessions until you notice that one method works. Stick with that method. You may have to change approaches, but err on the side of staying the course rather than the side of trying new things when the decision between the two is difficult. If you’re 50/50 on whether or not to change how you meditate, don’t.
  4. Learn to control your mind. This is the important part. You don’t progress from sitting in a thoughtless state for hours on end. Not when you first start. Maybe after that you’ll sit in a thoughtless state. Until then, focus on repeatedly bringing your mind back to the focal point. You don’t win when you focus successfully for an hour. You win when you bring your mind back to the focal point after it wanders. Just focusing doesn’t score you any points. You DO score a point whenever your mind wanders and you bring it back. Points are permanent and never go away. You can always rack up more. Keep bringing your mind back to the focal point and get a point for it. The more points you score, the easier it gets to score more points. Don’t overdo it. Don’t self-flagellate. Just keep bringing your mind back to the focal point. Keep racking up points.
  5. Bring it into everyday life. As you meditate, you will notice something. You will notice that your meditative state happens by itself. You will be driving or taking a walk, and BAM! You’re in a meditative state out of nowhere. This is a good sign. When this happens, start doing it on purpose. When your attention drifts while you’re cooking breakfast, bring your mind back to the present. The more you do it, the easier it gets. It is like a rusty switch where the rust falls off as you use it. Every time you meditate spontaneously, focus on prolonging that state. Once you reach this stage, you can rack up points in everyday life.
  6. Get your moral trip in order. You are gaining willpower. It is becoming one of your definitive traits. Use it to drop bad habits. As you score points, you become stronger. You get stronger every day. Use the willpower to score points, to increase the willpower even more, to score even more points. You will develop more focus, continually grow in strength. Keep bringing your mind back to the focal point. Get rid of your bad habits and you will find that you become even stronger. Strength becomes simply a part of your personality. You are getting better and getting better means being stronger, which makes it easier to get even better, which makes it easier to get even stronger. Let go of the things that make you weak. Willpower is now a definitive trait of yours.
  7. Lead. Many people will fail at this. If you are reading this site, there is a chance that you are part of the natural aristocracy. If you want to find out whether you can really make the cut, follow the instructions laid out here. Brett often speaks of putting the best people in charge. The only way that happens is when the best people put themselves in charge. If you are one of the best, then put yourself in charge. Follow these instructions and you will see. Keep bringing your mind back to the focal point. You will find that you are getting stronger.

Epic Video Game Starcraft Now Free

Tuesday, April 25th, 2017

Video games, black metal and literature all played a role in the rise of the Alt Right, but nothing did more on the video game front than epic games that involved the maintenance of complex groupings or a mythical-historical view of individual survival.

Starcraft was one such game and gave birth to a genre or two which took a similar approach. Like hybrids between Civilization and Taipan, these games emphasized building economies and tribes in order to defeat competing groups.

You can now play Starcraft for free thanks to its release as freeware by Blizzard Entertainment, its publisher. Maybe it will help stun awake a new generation.

False Dichotomy, Slippery Slope And Motte-And-Bailey Arguments

Friday, March 24th, 2017

Logical fallacies prove useful because, like many studies of the human animal and its mind, they reveal common pitfalls of cognition and analysis. They are less practical in arguments because they tend to get applied as rubber stamp style deflections, and are often misapplied, which leads to a need to analyze the fallacies for fallacies.

Of interest are a series of illusions which boil down to a very simple idea, namely, the imposition of a false binary on the world. In this mental error, it is assumed that there are only two states of outcome, with one excluding the other. This is called a false dilemma or false dichotomy:

A False Dilemma is a fallacy in which a person uses the following pattern of “reasoning”:

  1. Either claim X is true or claim Y is true (when X and Y could both be false).
  2. Claim Y is false.
  3. Therefore claim X is true.

However, this fallacy is not absolute; see the warning on “rubber stamping” above. For example, “Either we are suffering from global warming, or we are getting wiped out by pollution.” Both could be false, but if one is discussing evidence of some kind of breakdown or decline, and it is limited to two sources, this might not be a false argument.

More commonly you see this one as a vernacular expression of support for a program. “Either we adopt Obamacare, or we face revolution as people go bankrupt from healthcare costs,” for example. There are other options to these two, but the person arguing is hoping to exclude all of those possibilities in order to argue for his case against a weaker opposite.

Compare this to the Slippery Slope quasi-fallacy:

In most cases, there are a series of steps or gradations between one event and the one in question and no reason is given as to why the intervening steps or gradations will simply be bypassed. This “argument” has the following form:

  1. Event X has occurred (or will or might occur).
  2. Therefore event Y will inevitably happen.

In other words, the person arguing asserts that an event will lead to an extreme. This is a quasi-fallacy because it can be true if the intervening steps are true, which occurs if the final state is merely an intensification of the initial state. As historical examples show us, decisions have momentum, and if there is not a reason to stop a policy, it merely accelerates.

These two fallacies are very similar in that the person arguing is claiming that two extremes must exist. Either X leads to Y, or X does not lead to Y, with no variation in between. Since either of these may be false, we quickly slip into false dilemma or false dichotomy territory in the analysis of this fallacy.

For that reason, not every use of slippery slope is a fallacy; X can lead to Y, but depends on other data to be verified, unless (for example) we are looking at a historical pattern. At that point, referring to slippery slope as a fallacy is a form of the false dilemma or false dichotomy.

Now let us look at another example, the motte-and-bailey fallacy:

I will summarize it: a motte-and-bailey argument is where you have a strong ridiculous claim and a weak trivial one. You make the strong ridiculous claim. When your opponent counters by pointing out that the strong ridiculous claim is, in fact, ridiculous, you re-counter by saying, “No no no, I’m just saying [weak trivial claim].” You then go on to say, “Because of [weak trivial claim], it follows that [thing that follows from strong ridiculous claim but not weak trivial one.]”

For example, I claim that our physical bodies would not exist unless we perceived them through a social lens [strong ridiculous claim]. When you rightfully tell me I’m full of horse shit, I respond by saying, “No! I’m only saying that we understand bodies through a social lens.” [weak trivial claim] You agree to this, because it’s damn-near common sense for anyone who has thought about the issue. I then go on to say, “Therefore, not only gender, but biological sex itself, is socially constructed [follows from strong ridiculous claim], because biological sex is understood through the lens of gender [follows from weak trivial claim].”

In other words, with two claims X and Y, a condition of X or Y is asserted, with the idea that failure of one leads to the other. This enables the person arguing to backdoor the stronger claim on the basis of the weaker one through the implication that the two are related.

Translating into false dilemma, this becomes X->Y or not (X->Y) for the sake of arguing, essentially, that we either accept the linkage between the two, or we negate both claims, which also negates the partial truth stated in the weak claim. An implied false dilemma or false dichotomy thus exists there.

All of recent history comes from using a false dilemma to deny slippery slopes, such as “immigration leads to genetic replacement,” which are in fact logical because the final condition is only an increase of intensity of the starting condition, and their replacement with the false dilemma of “partial truth or not partial truth,” therefore the strong claim — which is not an increase of intensity, but a widening of scope — must be true.

For example, we are told that it is not true that immigration leads to ethnic replacement, but that because immigration has some advantages, immigration is necessary, even though there are many other ways to address the problem that immigration purports to solve.

On the other hand, it would be ridiculous to deny the slippery slope, since history shows us that when a population makes itself available to unlimited immigration, it tends to get replaced. The vast number of mixed-race societies across the globe are proof of this, with none of them showing signs of reversal.

For this reason, we come back to the accusations of false dilemma that inevitably follow when it is argued that immigration must be restricted. “Either we restrict immigration, or we are abolished,” sounds like it might be false, except that when one sees that the initial conditions lead to the extreme, the real false dilemma clearly lies elsewhere.

We are frequently told that “We either take immigrants, or we are abolished by low population, low revenues or lack of diversity.” This shows all three fallacies at work: a false dilemma in that we have other options, a false slippery slope in assuming that population or revenues will continue to fall, and a motte-and-bailey that has us assume that since immigration has some advantages, it is necessary.

Now we get to the big point, for which all of the above is prelude.

Leftism itself consists of a false dichotomy. Its origin, equality, comes from the demands of class warfare brought on by a splintered leadership structure. The argument advanced is: “Either we make people equal, or class warfare destroys us.” This fails because there are many options in between.

This argument fools us because there is a partial truth inherent to what is being said: class warfare is a threat. You can see the “first strike advantage” in that the person offering the argument presents it as an option, and then implicitly disclaims all other options, in an inverted form of the motte-and-bailey argument.

A little more reduction shows the false dichotomy inherent in this. They are arguing, in effect, “Accept my plan or all other options will fail,” which naturally is not proven. In this, its naked state, the argument stands revealed for the fallacy that it is, even if it is buried under several layers of misdirection to conceal its raw nature.

Death Spirals, Red Tide And Virtue Signaling

Thursday, March 23rd, 2017

Life is mathematical. Every organism faces a series of challenges which are defined more by numerical factors than anything else. For example, how much food is there? How many offspring must be produced? All of these calculations determine outcome more than doing one specific task so well that it overcomes the numeric limitations imposed upon it.

The mathematics of life determine survival. A parasitic disease, like a flu, that takes too many resources will kill the host and be less successful as quarantine kicks in; a rapidly-reproducing organism, like yeast, is most likely to reproduce too fast, consume all of its nutrition and die in a bloom of excess.

We see these events happen in nature all of the time. The dreaded “red tide” is one type of population bloom that occurs through algae which reproduce too much and then deprive the water of oxygen, killing off all sea life in the area. If not whacked back, crabgrass takes over lawns and chokes out every other species.

These extreme examples conceal the fact that these mathematical limits apply to every species. If there are too many deer, they will destroy enough trees that next season, they will starve. Too many squirrels means starving squirrels. But the same is even true of human attempts to form groups; if the group cannot limit its natural impulses, it implodes.

Let us look at an entertaining episode where human impulse control failures coordinated with natural over-population and created an ecocidal disaster that destroyed the overgrown species as well:

In August 1944, the Coast Guard released 29 reindeer on the island as a backup food source for the men. Barged over from Nunivak Island, the animals landed in an ungulate paradise: lichen mats four inches thick carpeted areas of the island, and the men of the Coast Guard station were the reindeer’s only potential predators.

…[thirteen years later the] herd was then at a staggering density of 47 reindeer per square mile. Klein noted the animals’ body size decreased since his last visit, as had the ratio of yearling reindeer to adults. All signs pointed to a crash ahead.

…in summer of 1966, he, another biologist and a botanist found the island covered with skeletons; they counted only 42 live reindeer, no fawns, 41 females and one male with abnormal antlers that probably wasn’t able to reproduce. During a few months, the reindeer population of St. Matthew had dropped by 99 percent.

Let us look at the mathematics of the situation:

St. Matthew then had the classic ingredients for a population explosion—a group of healthy large herbivores with a limited food supply and no creature above them in the food chain.

In other words, there is a mathematical threshold here imposed by the ratio of animals to resources given the need for the resources to replenish themselves. With few enough animals, the food source is able to renew itself; with too many, a situation like “eating the seed corn” occurs and there is no crop in the following year.

These thresholds are invisible because they are not formed of anything tangible or evident, only a prediction based on the mathematics of the situation. For this reason, human groups routinely stumble over these and self-destruct through a process known as a death spiral.

In a death spiral, a human group engages in a pathology based on what has worked in the past. They do this because of social factors, which ties into the same type of neurosis that causes “cargo cults” among human groups:

Cargo cult, any of the religious movements chiefly, but not solely, in Melanesia that exhibit belief in the imminence of a new age of blessing, to be initiated by the arrival of a special “cargo” of goods from supernatural sources—based on the observation by local residents of the delivery of supplies to colonial officials.

In these, people confuse what they were doing at the moment an event occurred with the cause of that event. This leads to groups engaging in religious rituals to bring back the cargo, even though the delivery of the cargo was initiated by events entirely unremoved from the group. This provides a good metaphor for human pathology.

A small village has a few dozen farmers. One of them has an abundant crop. “I didn’t do anything different, except sacrifice this fish to the god Ba-El,” he says. The other farmers face a difficult choice: if they fail to sacrifice a fish to Ba-El, and they do not have a good crop, they will appear incompetent to others. Whereas if they do, they are merely out one fish.

The economics of pathology unfold from this moment. The symbolic task does not represent a risk in itself directly, but will cause a “sin of omission” where those busy with the symbolic will miss actual problems. But the social cost of not doing the symbolic task could be much higher, especially if something goes wrong and then no one wants to aid the guy who did not conform.

As a result, economics dictate that people follow the socially acceptable path even though it requires the adoption of what is essentially a lie, which is the idea that the fish sacrifice made the abundant crop. The lie unites the social group. Through this method, the human group starts its equivalent of a yeast bloom or red tide, which is a virtue signaling death spiral.

In a death spiral of this type, appearance is more important than reality and simultaneously, is detached from reality much like the symbolic fish sacrifice mentioned above. This means to social success, and success in terms of realistic results, rapidly become opposites. Symbols and their referents even more widely diverge. And so, the civilization becomes dedicated to lying.

For example, the fish sacrifices may have never worked, but those farmers who were conscientious enough to plough, plant and irrigate correctly are also those prone to make fish sacrifices. And so, it appears that the talisman works; everyone does it and those who do not are not trusted, cannot get loans or sell their product, and are marginalized.

The result is that to be a successful farmer, one must make the fish sacrifice, because social factors mediate reality through the actions of other people needed by farmers. At this point, something fascinating happens.

Clearly the fish sacrifices are not working. Normally, we would conclude that the method either never worked, only partially worked or has stopped working, and place less emphasis on it. But because of social factors, we must double down and place more emphasis on it.

Through this runaway acceleration feedback loop, more fish sacrifices will be performed. They may happen daily or require more or bigger fish. Farmers will spend themselves bankrupt buying fish because to do otherwise is to lose social approval, and so to be unable to get help (loans, sales, labor) from others. Insanity replaces sanity.

A virtual signaling death spiral of this sort adds to the natural conditions for a sudden extinction: unlimited growth plus finite resources reaches a threshold, but now, the added wrinkle is that resources are being expended for symbolic and not realistic ends. This does not cause sudden failure, which is why it is deadly.

Instead, it causes a gradual slowdown. For every dollar made from a farm, ten cents go to fish. This cost is passed on to consumers, who now pass it on to others. Lawyers, teachers, and repairmen all charge ten percent more. This in turn raises costs to farmers, so they raise their costs in turn. This feedback loop continues until the economy is near collapse.

Human groups of all types fail through this process. Symbolic and social behaviors replace practical ones. Then, the group both divides itself internally over the issue of symbolic behaviors and how to interpret them, and bleeds itself dry pursuing non-issues instead of the obvious and massive actual threats.

We see these patterns time and again in human society:

  1. Communism. Being Leftist meant social success, so people went far Leftist and then destroyed their society. At the time when they needed to be fixing real problems like a lack of food in grocery stores, they were instead fighting over ideological issues.
  2. Greenland. This Nordic colony thrived on hunting ivory from walruses, but then the market discovered elephant ivory. Instead of admitting the failure of this market, the colony continued hunting walrus with the energy it should have spent relocating or finding new industry.
  3. South Africa. This colony made itself rich on natural resources until other sources were found. At that point, it could no longer support its underclasses, and mass revolt resulted in a typical diversity death spiral where two groups fight each other instead of looking toward a new source of income.
  4. Immigration. The West experienced a huge population boom after World War II and started looking for ways to fund the social benefits it had appointed to those people. Instead of admitting that it could not pay these benefits, it began importing immigrants, only to find the tax revenues from these were not what were hoped for.

Future human leaders will be more concerned with feedback loops that produce death cycles than we are now. Failure of organization to respond to changing resource needs, including to slow growth before a crisis, destroys civilizations. Instead of adapting, the dying organization relies on proxies which increase its free rider and tragedy of the commons crises.

Those looking for rules that can prevent this situation will be disappointed. Humans are biological organisms that vary in ability; those with low ability, even in the presence of enlightened rules, will only misinterpret those rules. Without perceptive leaders with the power to act decisively before a crisis, that group will fall into a virtue signaling death spiral and perish.

Modernity As Swarm Production

Saturday, March 18th, 2017

The chicken-and-egg question of civilization decline dogs us repeatedly. Which came first, democracy or breakdown? The answer may be shocking: the tendency of humans toward individualism, manifested in both bourgeois oblivion and prole present-tense me-firsting, overcomes societies once they succeed.

From Naked Lunch by William S. Burroughs:

The Divisionists occupy a mid-way position, could in fact be termed moderates…. They are called Divisionists because they literally divide. They cut off tiny bits of their flesh and grow exact replicas of themselves in embryo jelly. It seems probable, unless the process of division is halted, that eventually there will be only one replica of one sex on the planet: that is one person in the world with millions of separate bodies…. Are these bodies actually independent, and could they in time develop varied characteristics? I doubt it. Replicas must periodically recharge with the Mother Cell. This is an article of faith with the Divisionists, who live in fear of a replica revolution…. Some Divisionists think that the process can be halted short of the eventual monopoly of one replica. They say: “Just let me plant a few more replicas all over so I won’t be lonely when I travel…. And we must strictly control the division of Undesirables….” Every replica but your own is eventually an “Undesirable.” Of course if someone starts inundating an area with Identical Replicas, everyone knows what is going on. The other citizens are subject to declare a “Schluppit” (wholesale massacre of all identifiable replicas). To avoid extermination of their replicas, citizens dye, distort, and alter them with face and body molds. Only the most abandoned and shameless characters venture to manufacture I.R.s — Identical Replicas. (81)

The more important question with this in mind is how to resist it. So far the best resistance has come from aristocracy, but aristocrats tend to sacrifice themselves in battle, lessening the ratio of intelligent leaders to unpunished herd. And worse, when the intelligent are made into babysitters, they tend to self-destruct.

Compounding this is the tendency for human beings, even intelligent ones, to create a false social reality in which human intentions and feelings matter more than reality. Socializing reprograms our brains to defer to other people, not reality. On top of that, symbolic reality is more powerful to us, including the approval of others, because it creates a stronger signal in our brains.

If any human society survives in the future, it will do so through a dogmatic elitism and strict attention to morality of thriving in all areas. Ugliness will be banished, and the one-fifth of every generation that are born neurotic, resentful and oblivious will be dispatched to other lands. This seems harsh, but like nature, its harshness will result in better outcomes.

For those who imagine golden fields surrounded by happy people, this may be the price necessary to pay. Good to the good, and bad to the bad, in all things with an eye toward biology, namely that allowing the bad to persist endangers not just other people, but the shared effort toward which we give our lives in cooperation that takes up our irreplaceable time.

Fred Nietzsche is probably right in that currently, humanity is in the saddle between ape and greatness, and what holds us back is our fear for ourselves that has us resisting commitment to greater things than our own desires. And yet as the last century has shown us, a society dedicated to human desires becomes ugly and corrupting for all.

An Alt Right Goal

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017

As the news struggles to accept the suddenness of vast change forced upon it, the Alt Right has faded into the background hum a little bit. Part of this is that the Alt Right seems confused as to its own actual goals, or in other words, what it proposes instead of the failing system we have now.

What makes the Alt Right fascinating is that it arose organically in parallel between several belief systems — libertarians, human biodiversity, nationalist, deep ecologists and the new right — and then lived on through what was found in common between them, pushed to an extreme by its irreverent, absurdist troll culture.

But a different view would be that these different belief systems were not the cause of the Alt Right but rather a vocabulary through which it could spring up. Instead, the Alt Right came from a yearning for something so simple and powerful that it was nearly impossible to articulate. It is something one assumes, not speaks.

And yet, those of us who have grown up in a failed civilization and who have realized that this was the case from an early age have always yearned for something like the Alt Right. We were born depressed, have lived in ambivalence and alienation our entire lives, and finally found a voice and animated it however we could.

While the Alt Right proposes many related ideas — nationalism, anti-egalitarianism, post-democracy, futurism — the root behind them is a simple desire: we want to escape civilization collapse. We know that most societies collapse, but that someone can beat the odds and rise to a greatness merely dreamed of by the rest of humanity.

One cannot escape civilization collapse as one dodges a bullet. Instead, civilization collapse is like a path in a forest that leads to a large pit. The only solution is to get on another path that both (1) goes away from the pit and (2) goes somewhere good, so that one does not die the slow death of purposeless wandering until entropy becomes victorious.

This leads us to our goal: restore Western Civilization by giving it a purpose unrelated to individualism, equality or any of the impulses that cause fragmentation in a society. The Alt Right is our desire to be a great civilization again and to live our lives with meaning, instead of in service to consumerism, democracy and social popularity.

We want order. We want a path. We want meaning. That requires values, customs and something worth sacrificing for so that we can bond with life itself. We wish to see the infinity open before us and to become an eternal civilization, exploring the stars and establishing new great civilizations, with intricate histories, triumphs and tragedies.

This is what we are. We are the reflective people, or those who contemplate life and search for meaning not in ourselves but in the universe around us. From that we can bond our intuition to that of the cosmos, and from that, discover a way of life that fits who we are. We do not expect it to be universal; it is enough that it fits Us, and that is all we need.

The first step on this path is clear thinking not about what we hate, but about what we desire. We must visualize the future we see for ourselves, and make it become incarnate by sorting the data around us through our choice. This fits within the informational substructure to the universe that encloses our physical reality:

Perhaps the most renowned of its mysteries is the fact that the outcome of a quantum experiment can change depending on whether or not we choose to measure some property of the particles involved.

…The physicist Pascual Jordan, who worked with quantum guru Niels Bohr in Copenhagen in the 1920s, put it like this: “observations not only disturb what has to be measured, they produce it… We compel [a quantum particle] to assume a definite position.” In other words, Jordan said, “we ourselves produce the results of measurements.”

…Whenever, in these experiments, we discover the path of a quantum particle, its cloud of possible routes “collapses” into a single well-defined state. What’s more, the delayed-choice experiment implies that the sheer act of noticing, rather than any physical disturbance caused by measuring, can cause the collapse.

Our job is to notice our present options, and then put our focus into those which offer us a future of restored Western Civilization. In doing so, we make them more likely to become incarnate, much as our noticing can render light into particle or wave. We then become sorting engines within the calculation machine that is the cosmos, a pattern-based reality which constantly self-evolves.

The act of observation links the observer and the observed. This implies an informational basis to reality, as if it were composed of patterns that manifest in materiality, and shows us that we wield a force greater than materiality in the focus of our minds. When we create links between ourselves and ideas, we manifest them, albeit not directly like material force.

When Nietzsche said, “God is dead…and we have killed him,” what he means is that we have failed to rediscover things such as “God.” These are not innate to the universe because they are not universally accessible. Only those who forge their thinking into directed noticing can access these ideas, and their effects will remain invisible to others much as most truths are.

We know from Darwin that the whole universe acts as a calculating machine, forever refining its objects into a greater balance and efficiency. Our thoughts act the same way — this is one of the precepts of my upcoming book Parallelism — and so we see that our first task is to visualize and thus “attract” what we desire.

While that may not be known in precise visual terms, it can be known in general direction. We can stop reacting to what is happening as if we are trying to save a miserable society that makes people bored and frustrated. Instead, we can escape the loop of trying to salvage the dead and focus instead on rising again.

If the Alt Right has a goal, this is it. We want to restore Western Civilization by aiming for greatness. We wish to embrace excellence in our future and to use that, and not reacting to material problems, as our guide. It seems too New Age for us right now, but once upon a time, it was accepted knowledge, and perhaps deviation from that is responsible for our current downfall.

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