Amerika

The Heavy, Middle and Tail of the Alt Right

The Alt Right contributed handsomely to elect Trump during the 2016 elections. Despite a large body of knowledge available across many websites about the Alt Right, few read through much of it, which resulted in intuitive emergence of natural deviations.

The reference to “natural” is important because the core of the Alt Right is realism. If the Alt Right was conservative, some of the expected deviations would have been variations on existing conservative issues. But because the Alt Right is rooted in realism, extremism is not really possible, and squabbles mostly concern details and not degree.

Since most of the Alt Right involves smart people, it can be assumed that they know how things work. This includes how the military works with generals, officers, soldiers, logistics, strategies, tactics and operations. They most likely also know the system engineering phases involving user requirements, functional specifications, physical specifications, modelling, testing, operations and maintenance. Last but not least, they most likely also know something about project management of costs, quality and deliverables.

Based on this knowledge it would be fair to assume that each person positioned himself where it was convenient for him to use his existing knowledge. In all of these knowledge-bases the concept of tripartite strategy, tactics and operations appear. Each person intuitively aligned with one of these aspects.

For this reason, we can divide the Alt Right into strategy people who form the Alt Heavy, the tactics people the Alt Middle and the operational people the Alt Tail.

In a normal organization there would be communication between these groups, but not so in the Alt Right (mostly). Because the Alt Right was not a single organization, its Leftist opponents had difficulty in combating the Alt-Right via typical isolation and smearing techniques. The Alt-Right is not a political party, and if it was it may have caused Trump to lose, just like Le Pen lost in France because of the history and polarization of her party.

Productive organizations are generally measured by man-hours expended to reach a goal, but the effectiveness of the Alt Right is measured by Trump’s success. Therefore the number of hours did not matter so much as the tasks accomplished, because it was intuitively decided by each person, acting as his own leader.

This type of operational model can be seen in the military parable of the Strategic Corporal. Essentially what happens is that in a fast moving conflict, decisions evolves to lower and lower ranks until it gets to the Corporal actively engaged with the enemy.

Information flow currently experienced is out of proportion, justifying the way Alt Right is structured. Its tactics are ad hoc, or adjusting to the moment, based on coordination through ideas handed down from the Alt Heavy to the Alt Middle, and then adapted into memes, tropes and tactics by the Alt Tail.

Those of us in the Alt Middle tend to be goal-oriented, therefore we formulate ideas which make the objectives set by the Alt Heavy seem reasonable, and we do not directly face the enemy. In the meantime, the Alt Heavy looks at the changing political landscape and sends ideas down to us, where they are translated into real-world goals, and the Alt Tail then attempts to apply them by whatever means work.

Many in the Alt Right have project management experience, and so they likely have one, five and ten year objectives. What those objectives are is (for now) a secret, but it is likely that they concern the general, nearly emotional goals created by the Alt Heavy such as “spaceships and fields of wheat.”

A semi-decentralized structure like this works very well in a chaotic field where the enemy and overall goal are both well-defined. It will break down if a competing force, like the Alt Lite, weasels its way in between the Middle and Tail layers, changing objectives and therefore making the foot-soldiers of the Alt Right into agents of its downfall.

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