Amerika

Archive for the ‘Realism’ Category

Nihilism As A Management Theory For Human Organizations

Tuesday, July 11th, 2017

Over the last few decades, the gradual build-up of an insecure and even chaotic environment suggests that the world does not operate as humans think it does. Our predictions are incorrect, and so instability results we keep plodding forward based on illusions instead of a realistic understanding of the underlying structure of our world.

Welcome to the frontier of nihilism. Humans have their fantasies about how the world works, and if not restrained, these become accepted as truth which leads us into collision with the actual workings of nature. These workings are not so much material as informational or mathematical, such as the hidden patterns of standard distributions or golden ratios, but our human mindset is to ignore them and focus on what people want, how they prefer to behave, and the types of mental conveniences that they will support in political, consumer and social popularity spheres.

This is compounded by the fact that we cannot trust ourselves, at least as far as anyone who is publicly accountable goes. Lacan pointed out that any sponsored research creates ascriptive output because no sponsor wants to admit chaos, since this could be seen as self-incriminating in a lawsuit. In addition, there is no money or power to be found in telling people complex truths; they prefer pleasantly simple lies that confirm their own biases.

These dual factors lead to the behavior for which corporations are famous, namely “socializing risks while privatizing profits,” which means that they avoid engaging where society is delusional, and simply take advantage of the disaster and leave a mess behind while extracting profit. Then again, what else are they supposed to do? Human history provides a long list of grave sites of those who challenged the wisdom of crowds.

Nihilist states that there is no universality. Reality is seen to different degrees by different people, and natural ability and character determines how far — to what degree of accuracy — each person sees. Much like the Right represents order into which the individual fits, while the Left represents an order comprised solely of the individual, into which reality fits, the human struggle to avoid chaos is a balancing act between nihilism and humanism.

Looking further into chaos, it becomes clear that its impact is felt by ordinary people but that it originates mostly from organizations such as governments or businesses. Right now we are in the midst of a populist cultural wave against globalist governments, but no similar movement has emerged against business, which is the actual driver of the globalist agenda.

Ordinary people would welcome a counter-reaction to the domination of business over their lives. Marx anticipated this, but his solution was incorrect: the same mob rule that propels democracy also propels business, and the “populist” wave is in fact driven by the middle class, who know enough to see that globalism and rule by finance are bad for the future of our people.

Since business is a natural part of human life, the question becomes not pushing back against business per se, but against bad practices in business, which leads us to nihilism. Business risks do not address fake information; in fact, they ignore it.

However, for us to escape the pattern of human entropy, we must separate real information from the fake, which requires denying what humans believe to be true and instead focusing on radical realism and consequentialism, which look at results in reality instead of emotions, rights, feelings, judgments, desires and other human motivations.

Results are a better way to assess our actions than what is popular, and what is popular reflects motivations, not logical choices based on results. We can see this through several examples:

  1. Education. Students go to college in part for the experience of activism. When they arrive, they find that major issues are ignored in favor of those that are instantly polarizing, like the recent crusade for transgender bathrooms. This occurs because despite wanting to be politically active, the only risks that most students are aware of are STDs and student debt. The people who are charged with activism — the students — lack the experience to know what to be active about.
  2. Design. Aircraft designers undertake extensive risk-assessment activities to ensure safe passenger flight. But there are things they cannot address such as “fake data” including hoax bomb threats. These risks are typically categorized under the heading “operational risks” and ignored by designers with the assumption that each airline will figure out its own solutions. This endangers airline design itself, because if these operational risks are not managed, it could result in decreased demand and thus industry collapse, at which point no one would need airplane design.
  3. Industry. A Canadian CEO takes a job in South Africa where there is political pressure to increase the percentage of ethnic African people in senior management. He order this increase, relying on the notion that the Quality Manager will cover the risk of under-performing employees in general, and therefore will do so with affirmative action employees as well. However, since the goal is to get more black faces into the high offices, the CEO does not performance manage his black appointees. The result is that there is blind risk with these new employees, and since no one is overseeing it, losses pile up before anyone notices. The company goes bankrupt, and all employees including black ones find their jobs at risk.

In each of these cases, a “fake risk” is addressed while actual risks go unnoticed as part of the process of externalizing risk to others (non-students affected by student activism, airlines, and the employees of a firm) and internalizing profits. Donald Trump provides a classic example of a manager who quickly separates fake risk from operational risk and focuses on the latter while his competition waste time with the former.

That however flies in the face of politics itself, which demands a dual-risk assessment that looks at both operational risks and political risks, sometimes referred to as “optics.” In South Africa, this has resulted in a redundant management structure where South African corporations typically have two CEOs, one managing risk upward (operational) and the other downward (political).

Dual management however introduces neurosis and an inability to act where operational and political risk are not in unison. The task before any organization which wishes to survive is to solve the unintended problem of unrealism versus realism — or to separate the “fake news” from the real news — as a means of separating real risks from fake risks, and managing both with a priority on the real.

The emphasis on real risks as a priority above fake risks could be described as the nihilist mindset, and it has its own school of management theory in which nihilism is the first step in any process. The manager separates real from fake, then acts on the real and later attends to the fake, instead of making himself neurotic by trying to balance the two, which results in the fake taking precedence over the real because it can thwart the real if the two are not in unison.

Risk management is unique among management theories because it is not prescriptive; it does not tell you what to do, and instead only identifies risks. Nihilism suggests that “unpopular risks” be compartmentalized and addressed as risks to the organization itself, while “popular risks” — the “fake news” variety — should be considered as possibly raising or lowering the public value of the organization, but generally not threatening its destruction.

Managing risks is what Mother Nature expects us to do, failing of which, we will simply die off like the Egyptians, Athenians, Aztecs, Maya and Romans. There is no morality in Nature. Nature is the real news and the real risk, grounded in consequence and not human motivations, and when we fail to grasp its primacy, our organizations self-destruct and pass into history.

Pagan Christianity

Monday, June 19th, 2017

The Right desperately needs to get right with God.

Perhaps not in the way most would think, this need arises from the confusion about the role of religion in the Right. Some want it to be the basis of the Right and to install a de facto theocracy; others see it as irrelevant; still others argue that conservatism is not based on a single method, as ideology is, and that religion is one part — perhaps not for all people — of a bundle of methods that together make a solution but are not in themselves solutions.

These seem to be prerequisites that can be accidentally made into ideologies. For example, racial and ethnic homogeneity is necessary for a thriving society, but in itself it is not a whole solution, only part of one. Similarly, deposing democracy and equality is a partial solution. Together these and other methods make up a complete society.

For that reason, it makes sense to view religion as not a solution in itself, but also something that at least many of us need. This gets us away from the theocracy that forces us all to become believers, and instead points to rule by culture, which requires strong nationalism to establish.

This takes us in turn to the question, which religion?

Varg Vikernes makes a compelling point for avoiding Christianity. It leads to Leftism, and conspired against our people in the past, not to mention creates the “personal morality” conditions which encourage virtue signaling. In his view, as in Nietzsche’s, it is entirely too pacifistic and fatalistic of a religion.

Onto this we might add one other shining elephant in the room: at least geographically — the Christianity Identity folks have some interesting input here on the origins of Biblical Jews — it is foreign, or simply put not European. The names are not in our languages, nor are the locations, or presumably many of the customs and values.

To this it is important to add that Christianity is also at least from a surface reading, which over time in the hands of large groups is what it will be streamlined to be, it is dualistic, or posits another world where the rules are more real than the rules in this one. In other words, logic is not logic; there is a different logic, more like a human logic, which is actually real.

DARG adds another failing of Christianity, which relates to the personal morality it champions:

The beginning of this is a clarification on the terms sacred and profane. Christianity has made [humans] believe that the sacred is themselves, and equivalent to “tolerance and love” (towards what they define as permissible, of course) and “feeling nice and warm”, and that the profane is everything that opposes that. How convenient. The more historical and philosophical stance, on the other hand, sees in the every-day world, and all that it holds, benign of malignant, as profane; and sees in the world of the exceptional, of man going beyond the merely human, the sacred.

The personal morality of Christianity, and its exoteric nature or tendency to behave like an ideological system more than a deep-learning skill, make it a mixed bag when it comes to religions. It is the great unifier, but that also means it simplifies the message.

Pagan faiths, on the other hand, are monistic — they believe there is no alternate set of rules for the universe, and that all that we need to know can be found in nature, science and logic — and esoteric, or formed of cumulative self-directed learning in which some are naturally gifted to go farther than others. Exotericism is inherently egalitarian; esotericism is innately hierarchical.

In fact, pagan faiths more resemble a philosophy and folkway with metaphysical implications than a religion, or organized spiritual dogma for the sake of shaping mass behavior:

This effort of combining all non-Christian religions under one umbrella was, in fact, a clever strategy by the early Christians to remove the “pagan” faiths altogether. Using the Norse traditions as an example, the Vikings of the early medieval period had no true name for their religious following. In truth, the word religion would have been an unknown, foreign term to them. The Nordic tribes preferred the word “customs” as—like the Greeks and Romans—their rituals, beliefs, and traditions were undefined and fluidly interpreted, orally passed down rather than rigidly studied. There was no all-encompassing word for the belief in the Aesir and Vanir, and the various other beings and deities the ancient Norse worshiped, and there was no written text discussing their practices until the Christian author Snorri Sturluson wrote their mythology down in the 13th century.

Now, the picture gets more complex because Christianity is mostly Pagan. It is clearly a derivative, or rather a compilation and synthesis of the indigenous faiths of lands the Jewish scribes were in contact with, featuring the Greeks whose philosophy they loved above all else. This means that there are Greek, Nordic, Hindu and other faiths retold in the Bible.

There was a reason why formerly “pagan” communities switched to Christianity, namely that it was both mostly familiar and more effective for manipulating herds of people. The exoteric nature of Christianity means that its symbols can be directly adjusted to cause people to behave one way or another. Some of this was positive, namely getting people to leave behind previous antisocial habits.

However, this displacement of the original faiths also led to cultural erasure. When a simpler and more easily understood version of a tradition comes along, especially one that is written, people simply adopt the new and forget the old, which most importantly contains the roadmap to understanding the reasons for the beliefs.

What this means however is that there is a bridge between pagan faiths and Christianity, and that for this reason, we can have faith that is not strictly entrenched in either one, only expressed through it, and that over time, this may change to the simpler and more internal, informal and naturalistic pagan ideation. Consider the Perennial nature of spirituality:

It also makes sense to have some form of metaphysical outlook, perhaps of a Perennialist nature:

At the core of the Perennial Philosophy we find four fundamental doctrines.

  1. The phenomenal world of matter and of individualized consciousness — the world of things and animals and men and even gods — is the manifestation of a Divine Ground within which all partial realities have their being, and apart from which they would be non-existent.
  2. Human beings are capable not merely of knowing about the Divine Ground by inference; they can also realize its existence by a direct intuition, superior to discursive reasoning. This immediate knowledge unites the knower with that which is known.
  3. Man possesses a double nature, a phenomenal ego and an eternal Self, which is the inner man, the spirit, the spark of divinity within the soul. It is possible for a man, if he so desires, to identify himself with the spirit and therefore with the Divine Ground, which is of the same or like nature with the spirit.
  4. Man’s life on earth has only one end and purpose: to identify himself with his eternal Self and so to come to unitive knowledge of the Divine Ground.

If we distill religions to their core and take the intersection, we see a basic starting point that does not necessarily need formalization and, if kept informalized, loses its “human” projection and interpretation, and starts to resemble more the pagan faiths and even older Indo-European religion that our pre-Greek ancestors adopted.

This takes us away from religion as an external constraint that we adopt in order to shape ourselves and become a mass of people acting toward some goal, and reverts it to its original form, which is an observation about the nature of reality that reveals hints of the metaphysical embedded within nature:

As that great non-church and heterodox Christian Rudolf Steiner said: to disbelieve in God is to be, in a real sense, insane; in other words, it is to disbelieve any possibility of coherence, meaning and purpose – which is to regard all of life as a delusion.

…And to deny God within us and the world is to live earthly life in a state of detachment – since we can only observe and never actually participate in reality: we can never know.

In other words, religion is rediscovered by those with clarity of mind who can observe nature; this is the essence of transcendentalism, in which joy arises from understanding the nature of the world and seeing it in logic, therefore wisdom, and therefore beauty and a positive intention toward those of us caught in it, which in turn implies a life-like force to the universe, which per German Idealism — also found in Hinduism — is thought-like, dream-like or composed of thought or information.

In this way, we can see how for the West to rediscover the divine, Christianity must converge on the less formal and more intuitive forms of religious faith, which are the folk customs and existential search of the inner self that produces our classically reflective outlook.

Already we see signs of this. The Orthosphere-style thinkers tend either to embrace Catholicism, or outward-in, religious thinking, or to go the other way and embrace transcendentalism with discipline. This leads to a more naturalistic interpretation of religion that is naturally less obsessed with personality morality and its means-over-ends analysis.

Pagan Christianity, in addition to the Perennial Philosophy traits mentioned above per Aldous Huxley, also has a different map of the cosmos and metaphysical. At its core, this represents a shift from three paths (Father, Son, Holy Ghost) to four:

  1. Information-Space
  2. Godhead
  3. God
  4. Gods

In this mythos, the natural order of a universe comprised of information comes first, and with it the notion that we each have a role to serve determined by our logical placement within this order. Natural law and logic come first, and within them there are other spaces.

Godhead is the animating force of all that we know and the most essential tendencies of the universe. This works within the information-space, shaping us toward the divine and influencing the birth of the gods.

At the top, there is an all-encompassing God which represents holiness itself and less of an active personality than a tendency, like gravity or rain, to order the universe into beauty by balancing darkness and light so that existence itself can prevail. Since the universe is relative, darkness is necessary to emphasize light, much like death gives significance to life.

Below that are the gods, or animistic forces with distinct personalities. These are manifested forces which act according to their own interest, which means that we can respect them without expecting them to judge us or treat us according to some moral standard of our own. They simply do what they do, but they reflect the spirit of godhead, and so are divine while bridging to the profane world of the mundane.

At the bottom are the creatures of Earth and beyond, including humans and plants, who exhibit spirit of their own. These are able to partake in divinity by seeking transcendence and avoiding hubris, but will never fully know what is on the other side because they are limited to a perspective of the physical and individualized.

Perhaps that is enough of a start for now. We have seen how Christianity and Paganism are not that much different, how they share a core, and how we can rediscover that core by starting from reality itself. As with all esoteric things, that represents a doorway opened, and a path upon which each of us will journey a different distance, often down different tributaries.

A Gentler Interpretation Of Natural Selection

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

Nick Land writes about how rigorous external pressures produce the best things, arguing against tolerance and softness:

It is only due to a predominance of influences that are not only entirely morally indifferent, but indeed — from a human perspective — indescribably cruel, that nature has been capable of constructive action. Specifically, it is solely by way of the relentless, brutal culling of populations that any complex or adaptive traits have been sieved — with torturous inefficiency — from the chaos of natural existence. All health, beauty, intelligence, and social grace has been teased from a vast butcher’s yard of unbounded carnage, requiring incalculable eons of massacre to draw forth even the subtlest of advantages. This is not only a matter of the bloody grinding mills of selection, either, but also of the innumerable mutational abominations thrown up by the madness of chance, as it pursues its directionless path to some negligible preservable trait, and then — still further — of the unavowable horrors that ‘fitness’ (or sheer survival) itself predominantly entails.

His general point is worth attending: equality means no natural selection. Everyone is accepted equally, and that means that civilization spends its effort attempting to save every last person, no matter how unworthy of saving they are. It is not accepted to ask, “Is this person useful?” only to note that they are human and therefore, need to be treated equally to any other.

This leads to absurdities like protecting criminals, nurturing the homeless, diversity and social systems that save people from themselves. Equality is rejection of natural selection because the possibility of a natural selection event (NSE) terrifies the human individual. If you want power, tell people there will be no natural selection, and they will follow you forever.

However, despite the Fred Nietzsche and Cormac McCarthy appeal of the above, it slightly exaggerates natural selection, which works through a standard distribution like many other things. Most are in the middle, subject to chance; some are on the far right, and are masters of their fate; the broken are on the far left, and those are eliminated.

According to management theory, this bell curve reflects performance or applied theory:

In the wild, performance reflects how well an organism understands reality. Each organism has a mental model of the world which allows it to predicts the results of its actions; some succeed, most do adequately and suffer random events by not being in complete mastery, and some are inept and are most likely to be killed off.

Natural selection works by several mechanisms, then. First it trims off the incompetent. Next, it encourages those in the middle to rise to the top for stability. And finally, it uses those in the top as both a goal for the others and breeding stock to pass on higher traits to the rest. Eventually this results in highly similar populations, sort of like “equal” but not quite.

Bruce Charlton notes that in stable populations, the main threat comes from the accumulation of deleterious mutations. In a population which has reached stable status, the dominant threat seems to be too much equality, or that when everyone is baseline competent, other negative traits are allowed to survive by virtue of that general competence.

This parallels the life cycle of civilizations: a struggle to become established, a peak of ability, and then a long slow decline as the wealth, power and competence of that civilization allows the deleterious mutations to accumulate, precipitating an eventual population quality crash. Any egalitarian thinking triggers this decline.

Evolution is probably not as cruel as people think. Most creatures survive, at least above a certain level of competence, and those who find specialized niches tend to thrive. What determines survival is not so much the fact of breeding itself, but being toward the right of the bell curve, where the offspring will be reared better and part of the species that others seek to emulate.

What is cruel, however, is what happens when we suspend quality control. The medieval monks valued poverty for this reason: it forced each decision to become crucial, so that no bad choices could ride along with the good. In our present time, we are seeing the negative results of too much wealth and power, and the sooner we correct this, the sooner competence returns.

Consumerism Arises From A “Circular Ponzi Scheme”

Thursday, June 15th, 2017

Very few understand the roots of consumerism and assume that it is a natural outgrowth of capitalism. In actuality, consumerism occurs when government regulates capitalism, and is done to create economic growth so that government becomes more powerful. Witness this intense video by Asher Edelman, a famed businessman:

He argues that giving tax breaks to the wealthy results in them spending only 5-10% of the money they are able to conserve, but that giving that money to the underclasses ensures that they will spend all of it and then some, “pump priming” the economy with an infusion of cash.

Government took this further and realized that it could borrow to find this money, then pay off the debt with the resulting increase in the value of its currency based on greater demand for that currency caused by its increased valuation based on perceived greater demand because of higher consumer spending.

This creates a circular Ponzi scheme: government pays citizens, who then buy tons of stuff, at which point the value of currency goes up; government borrows against that currency value, dumps more money on the citizens, then taxes everyone to make government more powerful; finally, it uses that tax money to pay off the loans — in theory — and then repeats the cycle again.

Growth powered by consumerism is responsible for globalism, most of the environmental damage that we have done, and overpopulation. In the name of making government powerful, capitalism and a permanent minority underclass have been employed as weapons of growth, which has resulted in an out-of-control spiral which will eventually crash, and come down hard.

Pesticides Sacrificing 13 Million IQ Points Across Europe, Further Lobotomizing The Fallen West

Saturday, June 3rd, 2017

A recent report from the EU claims that pesticides are causing brain damage, finishing the process that television, democracy, junk food, inbreeding, miscegenation and “education” had begun:

A report based on the review said a California study had found that children whose mothers had traces of organophosphate metabolites – the basis for many pesticides – during pregnancy were more likely to have “adverse mental development at two years of age, attention problems at three-and-a-half and five years, and poorer intellectual development at seven years”.

Another study calculated that an estimated 13 million IQ points a year are lost as a result of pesticides, which represents a loss of approximately €125bn (£109bn) across the European Union.

The West fell years ago, and now its demonic overlords — empowered by the raw stupidity of the human ego in herds as found in democracy — are doing their best to exterminate the remaining people of promise in its lands. They will only be satisfied when those who could rebirth the West have died out or been outbred, ensuring the death of what was once the most promising civilization on Earth.

Modern Science Finds A Solution For 4Chan

Thursday, June 1st, 2017

Reeling from the assault of “weaponized autism” that has seen numerous Leftist schemes unraveled, modern science strikes back with an alleged cure for autism:

To the dismay of parents and practitioners, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported last year that the number of children with autism in the US had risen between 2000 and 2012 from one in 150 to one in 68. It’s no wonder that parents, medical professionals, and autism advocates are desperate to find something that can manage — or, better yet, cure — the disease.

Now researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have published a research article in the Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology that shows a tentative link between a 100-year old medication and improvements in children with autism.

Interestingly, the researchers claim that the drug interrupts a stuck cellular process. Cells under stress harden their membranes and cease or limit communication with other cells, creating a kind of shutdown metaphorically similar to the psychological effects of autism. By inhibiting extracellular ATP signaling, the drug Suramin gives cells the all-clear and they start interacting normally again.

While this is good news for the parents of autistic children, it cannot be long before it is prescribed as mandatory for right-wing commenters on the internet.

Deciphering The Egyptian DNA Puzzle

Thursday, June 1st, 2017

It is great when science confirms traditional wisdom. The net buzzes with discussion of a genetic study of ancient Egyptian mummies, following up on the the knowledge that parallel human evolution occurred in Europe (see contrarianism). But most have missed the point.

From the abstract:

The researchers discovered that ancient Egyptians closely resembled ancient and modern Near Eastern populations, especially those in the Levant, and had almost no DNA from sub-Saharan Africa. What’s more, the genetics of the mummies remained remarkably consistent even as different powers—including Nubians, Greeks, and Romans—conquered the empire.

Here we have an exercise in “hide the ball.” What is not being mentioned?

  1. Ancient Egyptians resembled modern Levantines. But who do modern Egyptians resemble?
  2. The mummies remained consistent despite occupations, but what about Egyptians as a whole?

We are — cleverly, so very cleverly — ducking the question of population change in Egypt. As a child, you too may have wondered why the Egyptians once built great monuments but now seem barely able to build a two-story house, and are known mainly for hopeless invasions of Israel and cuisine. What happened?

Luckily, National Geographic is willing to tell us something about modern Egyptian heritage:

This reference population is based on native Egyptians. As ancient populations first migrated from Africa, they passed first through northeast Africa to southwest Asia. The Northern Africa and Arabian components in Egypt are representative of that ancient migratory route, as well as later migrations from the Fertile Crescent back into Africa with the spread of agriculture over the past 10,000 years, and migrations in the seventh century with the spread of Islam from the Arabian Peninsula. The East African component likely reflects localized movement up the navigable Nile River, while the Southern Europe and Asia Minor components reflect the geographic and historical role of Egypt as a historical player in the economic and cultural growth across the Mediterranean region.

Modern Egyptians are 68% North African, 17% Arab, 4% Jewish, and 3% each from Asia Minor, East Africa and Southern Europe. In other words, while the mummies remained consistent, the population has not, which may explain why modern Egyptians do not do the things the ancient ones did.

Each population has a genetic profile based on centuries of adaptation, and these genes convey abilities and inclinations known as traits. By themselves, traits are rarely complete in the form we think of them, but when a profile is complete, different traits complement each other and produce the abilities, preferences and intuitive knowledge that we see in each population. Just as there is no single gene for intelligence, it takes many genes — like a net — to produce the effects we recognize as distinct to a population. When the genetic profile is disturbed by admixture, even trace admixture, then those abilities are lost.

In Egypt, we see a warning. Traditional wisdom was that as Egypt rose in power and wealth, people came from all over to be part of this civilization, and gradually replaced the original Egyptians with a group whose genetic net was disrupted and so lacked the abilities of the original. Originally it was thought that gradual absorption of Nubians shattered the Egyptian bloodline.

It turns out that the picture is more complex and delivers a more dire warning for us. The question is not what you mix with, but that you mix at all. Even trace admixed groups like Southern and Eastern Europeans, when mixed into another European group, can erase its genetic net and replace it with generic people lacking the original abilities.

What Is The Core Of Western Civilization?

Monday, May 22nd, 2017

As we embark on the lengthy process of declaring that Western Civilization went down a bad path and crashed, and realize that we must reboot it from the ashes, the question arises as to what the core of Western Civilization is.

Some, like Richard Spencer, identify this as “conquest,” or an extension of the Nietzschean duality of sensitivity and aggression. That makes sense. Others claim is the church, individuality, liberty or some other proxy for the good. Spencer is closer than those.

Around here, we refer to the core of the West as reflection, or the ability to mirror the outsider world in our inner selves, and to contemplate it with the transcendental purpose of understanding its ways and order so that we can adapt to them, and then improve our lot “qualitatively” by improving quality, goodness and accuracy in our thinking.

Another factor might be a transcendental frequently mentioned and commonly misunderstood, beauty. This means that life is made not on a utilitarian level, but to celebrate and enhance the goodness of life in everyday experience. These are things which lift us up and make us appreciate life in a renewed sensation that it might be holy or at least incomparable.

Roger Scruton writes in Country And Townhouse about the necessity of transcendental beauty:

Aged 14, quite by accident, I discovered the soul of Mozart. It was soon obvious to me that Mozart’s music contained a kind of knowledge that could never be obtained from a psychology textbook or even from a prayer book or sacred text. I made this knowledge my own – even though I could not tell you what it is, but only play it to you on the piano. But this knowledge guides me through life. Were the ability to respond to Mozart to be forgotten, I know that the world would be a much poorer place. We would have lost one avenue to the ‘knowledge of ends’. Those that have this knowledge will do whatever they can to perpetuate it. They will teach it to their children; they will put pressure on schools and universities to do the same. They will do this not for their own good but for the common good, knowing that something necessary to human life is at stake.

…As long as places and times exist where this can be done there is hope in the world. Wordsworth wrote that ‘getting and spending, we lay waste our powers’. But when we stand back from the mill of consumption and look on the turbulent waters with the eye of an artist, we are rested in our hearts and our powers are restored. People who do this are the friends of order in a world of entropy, for they see, in the depths of the swirling pool, the still point where meaning lies. They cannot describe what they see, and that is why the highest forms of art exist – not to describe the meaning, but to reveal it, as the loveliness of the world was revealed on that first imagined Sabbath.

The core of the West is found in this reflective outlook: to see the beauty of the world, to bring it to an apex of quality, and then to let it infuse us and guide us in all of our tasks, both exceptional and mundane.

Leftist Evolution Dogma Possibly Overturned

Monday, May 22nd, 2017

The Left has maintained a death-grip on academia and the sciences for some time now, but the mantle of ideological conformity is beginning to slip. It seems that the “Out of Africa” theory of human origins may not be as absolute as once thought:

Currently, most experts believe that our human lineage split from apes around seven million years ago in central Africa, where hominids remained for the next five million years before venturing further afield.

But two fossils of an ape-like creature which had human-like teeth have been found in Bulgaria and Greece, dating to 7.2 million years ago.

…The discovery of the creature, named Graecopithecus freybergi, and nicknameded ‘El Graeco’ by scientists, proves our ancestors were already starting to evolve in Europe 200,000 years before the earliest African hominid.

If the Leftists follow their usual game plan, there will be much fear/uncertainty/doubt spread about this idea in the coming weeks, followed by “alternate theories” based on the idea that these fossils were either wrongly dated, or consisted of animals which briefly ventured out of Africa during a warming spell and then went back to evolve into modern humanity.

Meditation For Übermenschen

Tuesday, May 16th, 2017

The alt-right is full of exhortations to self improvement. Lift weights! Do martial arts! Study science and math! But what of meditation?

Meditation is clearly beneficial to anyone attempting to survive among the ruins and improve themselves. Take a gander at this article named “This Is Your Brain On Meditation” from Stanford University:

Your brain tunes out the outer world during meditation, and on brain scans of meditators, scientists can see increased activity in default mode network – which is associated with better memory, goal setting, and self-awareness.

You want to rise up and turn the tide of Western decay. If you’re going to do that, you will need to put your mind in order and develop self-control, discipline and mental clarity. You have to focus. Rather than put together a reading list of books that none of you will buy, I’ve condensed everything that you need in order to get started into a nifty list. Pay attention and notice every word. Here’s how it works:

  1. Find a comfortable position in which you cannot fall asleep. As you progress in your practice, you will sit for longer and longer periods. Don’t bother getting the position perfect at the beginning, just comfortable enough to sit for ten minutes at the start. You will fidget and shift around at first. Trial and error are a big part of meditation, so you’ll need to refine your position as you go. Don’t bother doing full-lotus, unless you are already very flexible and like the position. Websearch “zafu” and “kneeling bench” to see some other options. Sitting in a chair works, but sit up straight so your chair doesn’t touch the back. This is about focus, paying attention, and noticing things.
  2. Begin with ten minutes and gradually increase your time. Figure out how long you can meditate and sit for five minutes longer than that. As soon as you notice that you’re comfortable, bump it up another five. Keep doing this until you’re up to an hour every day. This may take anywhere from a few months to a few years. You will notice it getting easier as time passes.
  3. Pick a focal point. You can concentrate on the feeling of breath in your nose, your chest rising and falling, the area just below your navel, the way your palms feel, or any other thing. Pick one and stick with it. You can count your breaths up to 10 repeatedly if you like. Different things work for different people. Experiment around for a few sessions until you notice that one method works. Stick with that method. You may have to change approaches, but err on the side of staying the course rather than the side of trying new things when the decision between the two is difficult. If you’re 50/50 on whether or not to change how you meditate, don’t.
  4. Learn to control your mind. This is the important part. You don’t progress from sitting in a thoughtless state for hours on end. Not when you first start. Maybe after that you’ll sit in a thoughtless state. Until then, focus on repeatedly bringing your mind back to the focal point. You don’t win when you focus successfully for an hour. You win when you bring your mind back to the focal point after it wanders. Just focusing doesn’t score you any points. You DO score a point whenever your mind wanders and you bring it back. Points are permanent and never go away. You can always rack up more. Keep bringing your mind back to the focal point and get a point for it. The more points you score, the easier it gets to score more points. Don’t overdo it. Don’t self-flagellate. Just keep bringing your mind back to the focal point. Keep racking up points.
  5. Bring it into everyday life. As you meditate, you will notice something. You will notice that your meditative state happens by itself. You will be driving or taking a walk, and BAM! You’re in a meditative state out of nowhere. This is a good sign. When this happens, start doing it on purpose. When your attention drifts while you’re cooking breakfast, bring your mind back to the present. The more you do it, the easier it gets. It is like a rusty switch where the rust falls off as you use it. Every time you meditate spontaneously, focus on prolonging that state. Once you reach this stage, you can rack up points in everyday life.
  6. Get your moral trip in order. You are gaining willpower. It is becoming one of your definitive traits. Use it to drop bad habits. As you score points, you become stronger. You get stronger every day. Use the willpower to score points, to increase the willpower even more, to score even more points. You will develop more focus, continually grow in strength. Keep bringing your mind back to the focal point. Get rid of your bad habits and you will find that you become even stronger. Strength becomes simply a part of your personality. You are getting better and getting better means being stronger, which makes it easier to get even better, which makes it easier to get even stronger. Let go of the things that make you weak. Willpower is now a definitive trait of yours.
  7. Lead. Many people will fail at this. If you are reading this site, there is a chance that you are part of the natural aristocracy. If you want to find out whether you can really make the cut, follow the instructions laid out here. Brett often speaks of putting the best people in charge. The only way that happens is when the best people put themselves in charge. If you are one of the best, then put yourself in charge. Follow these instructions and you will see. Keep bringing your mind back to the focal point. You will find that you are getting stronger.

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