Amerika

Posts Tagged ‘jobs’

Did Technology Destroy Society, Or Leftist Social Changes?

Thursday, November 16th, 2017

Frequently people argue that our society was just chugging along fine until technology came along and destroyed us. This proves to be a clever way of letting us off the hook for our bad decisions, and joins bias against the Rich,™ anti-Semitism and blaming climate change as a variety of scapegoating.

Scapegoating technology is convenient because it guarantees that nothing will ever be done. We benefit greatly from technology, so asking us to drop it all and move to mud huts is something few want to do, not to mention the geopolitical reality that any society which does so will be invaded and conquered by those who did not drop their tech.

If we are honest, we will place the blame where it belongs, which is in the thread of individualism running from The Renaissance™ through The Enlightenment™ and finally getting voice with the French Revolution, in parallel to the events in ancient Athens that ushered that formerly-promising civilization into the dustbin of history.

We can see this rationalization present in a discussion of the sexual revolution and the negative impact it has had:

My own research points to a more straightforward and primal explanation for the slowed pace toward marriage: For American men, sex has become rather cheap. As compared to the past, many women today expect little in return for sex, in terms of time, attention, commitment or fidelity. Men, in turn, do not feel compelled to supply these goods as they once did. It is the new sexual norm for Americans, men and women alike, of every age.

This transformation was driven in part by birth control. Its widespread adoption by women in recent decades not only boosted their educational and economic fortunes but also reduced their dependence on men. As the risk of pregnancy radically declined, sex shed many of the social and personal costs that once encouraged women to wait.

These forces have been at work for more than a half-century, since the birth-control pill was invented in 1960, but it seems that our norms and narratives about sexual relationships have finally caught up with the technology. Data collected in 2014 for the “Relationships in America” project—a national survey of over 15,000 adults, ages 18 to 60, that I oversaw for the Austin Institute for the Study of Family and Culture—asked respondents when they first had sex in their current or most recent relationship. After six months of dating? After two? The most common experience—reported by 32% of men under 40—was having sex with their current partner before the relationship had begun. This is sooner than most women we interviewed would prefer.

It is always easier to blame something external like the birth control pill, but the grim fact is that sexual liberation had already been increasing for over a century thanks to earlier forms of condoms, diaphragms and other more complicated but still reasonably effective means of birth control, and that this was part of a larger movement of female liberation from traditional roles that included the ability to vote, own property, and most importantly, to have jobs.

A woman with a job is no longer dependent on moving from the house of her parents to that of her spouse. She can get herself an apartment in the city, where she is anonymous, and behave however she wants, knowing that it will not be remembered when it comes time to get a spouse. She can lie about her sexual past, and then have the best of both worlds: she can have her fun and get married later, a sort of sexual Pascal’s Wager.

The so-called “good news” that divorces are declining conceals the fact that the main reason for this is that fewer people are getting married. Courts favor the woman, and so for a man, there is nothing but risk. He knows instinctively that women who have more sex are less likely to form lasting bonds, and she can easily get a job and move out, so he will be left paying alimony and child support while she goes on to have more sexual liaisons. For a man, the only winning strategy is not to play, unless he is fortunate enough to find a traditional woman.

Her job quickly becomes the most important thing in her life because it is a lifeline which has replaced her parents and any future family she might start. With the job, she has money, so she can have an apartment and live on her own, a bold and independent woman! Interestingly, the world wars contributed the most to this mentality, because for the first time many women were working.

The job appeals to the narrative of personal power that modern people adore. In an age of individualism, nothing is more important than making choices that reflect your personality and interests. For women, this makes them more powerful than men, because they control access to reproduction, and therefore, have men dependent on them. This is why they keep these jobs even after marriage, despite having to shove the kids into daycare and then school days crammed with make-work.

But like the other Leftist social changes, it takes decades for the effects to shake out, but now we see that women having jobs results in mental instability for their children, a cost passed on to society that lessens the chance of that child, in turn, having a family:

Ms. Komisar’s interest in early childhood development grew out of her three decades’ experience treating families, first as a clinical social worker and later as an analyst. “What I was seeing was an increase in children being diagnosed with ADHD and an increase in aggression in children, particularly in little boys, and an increase in depression in little girls.” More youngsters were also being diagnosed with “social disorders” whose symptoms resembled those of autism—“having difficulty relating to other children, having difficulty with empathy.”

As Ms. Komisar “started to put the pieces together,” she found that “the absence of mothers in children’s lives on a daily basis was what I saw to be one of the triggers for these mental disorders.” She began to devour the scientific literature and found that it reinforced her intuition.

When we replace the family with the workplace, children suffer from neglect and an enduring sense of being unwanted. This in turn makes them more likely to carry their mental instability into society and pass it on to any children that they may have.

We could try to blame this on technology, but like many things, it is a symptom or an enabler, but not the cause. As individualism has risen, the individual has become more important than the evident mathematics or nature, called “natural law,” or social and cultural values. At the same time, cities and social mobility have made people more anonymous, with their bad acts forgotten.

This creates a “tragedy of the commons” where people rush to exploit what society offers, knowing that there are no consequences to them personally. From this comes the condition that, as the saying goes, we cannot have nice things. With the rise of individualism worldwide, this can be seen in non-Western societies:

In China, where there are some 16 million shared bikes on the street and MoBike alone now has over a million, the authorities have been forced to clear up ziggurats of discarded bikes. Residents of Hangzhou became so irritated by bikes lazily dumped by riders, and reportedly sabotaged by angry cab drivers, that the authorities were forced to round up 23,000 bikes and dump them in 16 corrals around the city.

“There’s no sense of decency any more,” one Beijing resident recently told the New York Times after finding a bike ditched in a bush outside his home. “We treat each other like enemies.”

We either have social order, or we have equality, which guarantees individualism by separating the individual from the consequences of his actions against the larger social, natural and cultural order. Technology simply accelerates the power of the individual and the anonymity, allowing this to spread any further.

If we want civilization back, and now that globalism has failed and with it cast doubt on Leftism and democracy, we will find the necessity of unraveling individualism and replacing it with a sense of obligation to nature, social order, culture and heritage. We have seen the other possible direction, and it leads to horrors and misery.

Why Jobs Take Your Soul And How Conservatives Can Fix Them

Thursday, November 2nd, 2017

Most conservatives embrace the “work hard, pray hard” mentality that is typical of people who are looking for a reason to prove that they are good and worthy, which raises the question of why conservatives have such a whipped, domesticated mentality. Undoubtedly, being a minority viewpoint in a world that is gradually grinding toward the Left and has been for centuries induces such despondency.

However, this confuses a method for the goal, which is an eternal failing. Our purpose is to conserve the best of our civilization, not the best option offered by the current regime or political order. This is why the notion of “American conservatives” proves ridiculous; there is no conservatism specific to a political entity, because incarnations of civilization serve the root civilization itself, which in our case is Western Civilization.

If we are to conserve the best of our civilization independent of the current year, we require an understanding not just of philosophy and prescriptive methods, but what provides a healthy life for the citizens who will create that civilization in each new generation. This raises the question of whether “work,” or jobs and the bureaucracy required to run an independent business, are healthy for those citizens. For some, these activities do not prove a burden, but these do not appear to be those with an interest in nurturing civilization.

Michel Houellebecq estimates that 90% of the activity in a modern job is not necessary. This makes sense when we consider that with high mobility to citizens, both in socioeconomic status and geographic area, the prime consideration for management regarding any employee role becomes how to replace those employees when they move on. Any role which cannot be replicated presents a problem for management, since then a department must be restructured. Instead, the bureaucracy demands that jobs be subdivided into nearly microscopic roles in telescoping hierarchies which function by “accountability,” or delivery of pre-defined results and conformity to paperwork and attendance demands, rather than a measurement of results, and this even extends into the tax, licensing, certification and regulatory systems that impose their requirements on independent businesses.

All of those influences manifest in make-work, or activities done so that they can be visually noticed whether in the office or on paperwork, so that the managers above the people in question can demonstrate their accountability to those above them. This eventuates in jobs consisting of pro forma activities for the sake of the management hierarchy, which itself suffers from the instability of the accountability system in layers above it:

Back in the early-1930s, renowned economist, John Maynard Keynes, predicted that technical innovations and rising productivity would mean that advanced country workers would be able to work only 15 hours and still enjoy rising living standards.

In a highly amusing, but also somewhat depressing article in Strike! Magazine, David Graeber asks why Keynes’ prophecy has not come true and instead we find ourselves working a range of meaningless “bullshit jobs” that many of us hate:

There’s every reason to believe he [Keynes] was right. In technological terms, we are quite capable of this. And yet it didn’t happen. Instead, technology has been marshaled, if anything, to figure out ways to make us all work more. In order to achieve this, jobs have had to be created that are, effectively, pointless. Huge swathes of people, in Europe and North America in particular, spend their entire working lives performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed. The moral and spiritual damage that comes from this situation is profound. It is a scar across our collective soul. Yet virtually no one talks about it.

…But rather than allowing a massive reduction of working hours to free the world’s population to pursue their own projects, pleasures, visions, and ideas, we have seen the ballooning not even so much of the “service” sector as of the administrative sector, up to and including the creation of whole new industries like financial services or telemarketing, or the unprecedented expansion of sectors like corporate law, academic and health administration, human resources, and public relations…

…It’s important to recognized this deep-rooted difference in values, even in a society that led the Industrial Revolution, and how America has (remarkably) managed to impose some of its workaholism on much of the rest of the world. Here, for instance, is Wikipedia on de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America:

…This rapidly democratizing society, as Tocqueville understood it, had a population devoted to “middling” values which wanted to amass, through hard work, vast fortunes. In Tocqueville’s mind, this explained why America was so different from Europe. In Europe, he claimed, nobody cared about making money. The lower classes had no hope of gaining more than minimal wealth, while the upper classes found it crass, vulgar, and unbecoming of their sort to care about something as unseemly as money; many were virtually guaranteed wealth and took it for granted. At the same time in America, workers would see people fashioned in exquisite attire and merely proclaim that through hard work they too would soon possess the fortune necessary to enjoy such luxuries.

Of the above explanations, only the one offered by de Tocqueville makes sense: in an egalitarian society, being an equal worker is the ideal so that others accept you as not attempting to avoid the burden of equal contribution, and so people make a show of working. When coupled with an accountability culture that measures people by external traits such as completed projects and objectives met, instead of looking at internal traits like intelligence and character, this creates an unbearable urge for everyone to be busy all of the time. This then becomes a form of competition.

You have undoubtedly seen this at an office. A new worker comes in and, instead of leaving at five like everyone else, she stays until six very obviously working on something that looks important. Everyone else in the office realizes that this is the new standard, because the person who stays until six is going to get promoted over the rest and fired last, so soon everyone stays until six. Then someone starts staying until seven…

Since we look at external traits instead of inner ones, we are accumulating people who can do what is asked of them and therefore are kept around despite being abusive:

Research in the United Kingdom and the United States suggests that jerk-infested workplaces are common: a 2000 study by Loraleigh Keashly and Karen Jagatic found that 27 percent of the workers in a representative sample of 700 Michigan residents experienced mistreatment by someone in the workplace. Some occupations, such as medical ones, are especially bad. A 2003 study of 461 nurses found that in the month before it was conducted, 91 percent had experienced verbal abuse, defined as mistreatment that left them feeling attacked, devalued, or humiliated. Physicians were the most frequent abusers.

This abusive work environment creates great stress for the individual, but is joined by the ambiguity of work itself. Jobs separate us by a layer from the effects of our actions; not only are we specialized, so that no one person sees any process from start to finish, but the hierarchy of managers determine success through their own measurements, which are usually pro forma and so do not fully coincide with real-world needs.

Even more, the social requirements of the workplace separate us from actual effectiveness. Managers like people who get along with the team because those people produce fewer complaints, but because this is a formal requirement, sociopaths and antisocial behavior cases recognize it from miles away and are able to fool the managers (a form of “gaming the system”) just about every time. Those who are less likely to think in terms of manipulation are unaware of this requirement, and so come across as more contentious while the actual malefactors slide under the radar.

We can tell this is true because managers rank intelligence last as traits they desire in a worker, well below the conformity surrogates of “professionalism” and “reliability,” because having a worker who causes no problems and is always there makes the manager look good and eliminates risk to his job:

Most people go to work, much as they went to school, for social reasons. They would be lonely otherwise and since most are extroverts, they have no idea what to do with themselves, or how to evaluate what they should be doing, without getting feedback from the group. They gain a sense of uplifting well-being from being part of a happy group, so when others are pleased, they feel contentment. Much of work consists of managing expectations through social interaction, and by pacifying others, achieving the positive estimation of the group.

All of these stages of removal from the actual task serve to benefit the less-competent, punish the competent, and create ambiguity about what will be rewarded. People depend on their paychecks and fear being fired, so they take affirmative steps to ingratiate themselves with others and their managers. This also produces a need for make-work activities. The fundamental uncertainty and unfairness of this situation creates great stress in even the average worker.

We are learning that stress, like inflammation, can be destructive to our health, and jobs induce a unique kind of stress that is a daily event, changing who we are biologically as well as mentally:

Researchers from Brigham Young University (BYU) found that stress could be just as harmful to the human body as a nutritionally poor diet.

The scientists discovered that when female mice were exposed to stress, their gut microbiota—the microorganisms vital to digestive and metabolic health—morphed to look like the mice had been eating a high-fat diet.

“Stress can be harmful in a lot of ways but this research is novel in that it ties stress to female-specific changes in the gut microbiota,” BYU professor of microbiology and molecular biology Laura Bridgewater said in a statement. “We sometimes think of stress as a purely psychological phenomenon but it causes distinct physical changes.”

We can conceive of stress as having several components: it must be a situation we cannot change, which recurs frequently, and which has an impact on our future. Raw production, like owning a farm, produces worry in terms of attempting to achieve results; work induces stress by piling stuff on us to do without certainty of success, especially since that success is divorced from raw production and highly dependent on authority and social influences. Workplaces are stressful because they are necessary and capricious.

Authority tends to work from a negative outlook just as social influences do. These both focus on removing threats more than rewarding good behavior because they are applied from outside the individual by those observing appearances, both of the individual and of the effects in others. This herd behavior effect means that someone who does everything right, but slips up in some crucial way, is destroyed, while those who do most things poorly or in a mediocre way but carefully watch their behavior get ahead. This punishes and removes people with any passion for life, forcing us to hide our inner selves and become actors, not to mention avoid most social interaction because of the risk.

In workplaces, the “heckler’s veto” dominates, meaning that managers focus on eliminating controversy instead of achieving results. This means that if doing something right is not universally accepted, managers select a compromise and therefore consistently dumb-down and make mediocre everything they touch in the interest of avoiding “bad optics.” The external nature of control, based on appearance and not results in reality, guarantees this result. The futility of attempting to perform and being hobbled by the group contributes to stress for the highest performers.

The damage done by stress has been well documented in medical lore:

Stress that’s left unchecked can contribute to many health problems, such as high blood pressure, heart disease, obesity and diabetes.

If we look at the list of problems likely to kill us, those illnesses rank high on the list.

Long-term stress, such as that created by jobs, is the most damaging:

Health problems can occur if the stress response goes on for too long or becomes chronic, such as when the source of stress is constant, or if the response continues after the danger has subsided. With chronic stress, those same life-saving responses in your body can suppress immune, digestive, sleep, and reproductive systems, which may cause them to stop working normally.

…Routine stress may be the hardest type of stress to notice at first. Because the source of stress tends to be more constant than in cases of acute or traumatic stress, the body gets no clear signal to return to normal functioning. Over time, continued strain on your body from routine stress may contribute to serious health problems, such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and other illnesses, as well as mental disorders like depression or anxiety.

In nature, the role of stress is to prepare us to act when a threat is present. At jobs, however, the threat is both constantly present and unpredictable, so the stress becomes chronic because people are experiencing pain and fear about things they not only cannot control, but whose reasoning and motivations are hidden.

That chronic stress induces inflammation which can actually alter the genetics of the people involved:

Researchers found that chronic stress changes gene activity of immune cells before they enter the bloodstream so that they’re ready to fight infection or trauma — even when there is no infection or trauma to fight. This then leads to increased inflammation.

This phenomenon was seen in mice, as well as in blood samples from people with poor socioeconomic statuses (a predictor of chronic stress), reported the researchers from Ohio State University, the University of California, Los Angeles, Northwestern University and the University of British Columbia.

“There is a stress-induced alteration in the bone marrow in both our mouse model and in chronically stressed humans that selects for a cell that’s going to be pro-inflammatory,” study researcher John Sheridan, a professor at Ohio State University and associate director of the university’s Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, said in a statement. “So what this suggests is that if you’re working for a really bad boss over a long period of time, that experience may play out at the level of gene expression in your immune system.”

We can see the effects of this mutational load through the links between inflammation and cancer, a disease caused by mutated cells going rogue and taking over the body like a parasitic organism:

However, while the genetic changes that occur within cancer cells themselves, such as activated oncogenes or dysfunctional tumor suppressors, are responsible for many aspects of cancer development, they are not sufficient. Tumor promotion and progression are dependent on ancillary processes provided by cells of the tumor environment but that are not necessarily cancerous themselves. Inflammation has long been associated with the development of cancer…Epidemiological evidence points to a connection between inflammation and a predisposition for the development of cancer, i.e. long-term inflammation leads to the development of dysplasia.

This genetic corruption can occur through stress alone, as previous articles have shown us, and simultaneously result in mutations and, if those go unchecked, cancers as well as other responses by the body such as autoimmune disorders. The body does not recognize its own mutated cells and attacks them, which is the opposite situation as with cancer, where it fails to recognize and attack its parasitic inner mutants.

Most diseases that are widespread and seemingly intractable in the modern time can be explained as the result of stress-induced inflammation. This could explain why, despite medical advances, sickness is so prevalent. Inflammation leads to other diseases, and stress creates an inability to regulate inflammation:

A research team led by Carnegie Mellon University’s Sheldon Cohen has found that chronic psychological stress is associated with the body losing its ability to regulate the inflammatory response. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the research shows for the first time that the effects of psychological stress on the body’s ability to regulate inflammation can promote the development and progression of disease.

…Specifically, immune cells become insensitive to cortisol’s regulatory effect. In turn, runaway inflammation is thought to promote the development and progression of many diseases.

…”When under stress, cells of the immune system are unable to respond to hormonal control, and consequently, produce levels of inflammation that promote disease. Because inflammation plays a role in many diseases such as cardiovascular, asthma and autoimmune disorders, this model suggests why stress impacts them as well.”

With the loss of ability to regulate its inflammatory response, there is no system limiting the inflammation and, over time, this induces other disorders. With inflammation, common disorders become dangerous.

Not only can inflammation exacerbate existing diseases, but it can cause the brain to attack itself. Inflammation can lead to brain inflammation, memory loss and depression:

The researchers suspected that the stress was affecting the mice’s hippocampi, a part of the brain key to memory and spatial navigation. They found cells from mice’s immune system, called macrophages, in the hippocampus, and the macrophages were preventing the growth of more brain cells.

The stress, it seemed, was causing the mice’s immune systems to attack their own brains, causing inflammation. The researchers dosed the mice a drug known to reduce inflammation to see how they would respond. Though their social avoidance and brain cell deficit persisted, the mice had fewer macrophages in their brains and their memories returned to normal, indicating to the researchers that inflammation was behind the neurological effects of chronic stress.

In turn, this can have cognitive effects that also resemble problems of modern: the “memory hole” and social avoidance, suggesting that these rising trends may not be the result of cultural and economic pressures, but of biological changes — mutations — in our brains and the associated effects of inflammation and mutation.

This in turn could explain the reason for modern life to have become so toxic of late; while we have been pursuing the dream of wealth and technology, our inability to address our broken control structures and dark organizations has created a hellish life of stress that has been mutating us for centuries:

Penman labels the cultural characteristics that create and maintain a civilization as C. C includes industriousness, ability to cooperate, and moderation in food, drink, and sex. Chronic mild hunger produces hormonal, behavioral, and epigenetic changes that make people harder working and more cooperative. In societies with plentiful food similar effects can be achieved through religion and other social institutions: “Human societies, by a process of trial and error, have developed cultural practices which mimic the physiological effects of hunger” (14).

While C behaviors are required; “A successful civilization needs . . . some level of warlike aggression” (39). This should be disciplined aggression, group or collective assertion, not individual violence. Penman labels this component of civilization as V for vigor. Characteristics of V are a pioneering spirit, high morale, and the urge to expand and explore. The author offers Victorian Britain as a good mix of C and V.

V promoters include: intermittent (not chronic) stress, patriarchy, “an anxious but affectionate mother” and exposure to adult authority in late childhood” (48). “One final V-promoter in human societies is control of women’s sexual behavior” (49). In summary, “the temperamental complexes labeled C and V can be considered the fundamental building blocks of civilization” (54).

Through epigenetic changes, natural stress produces strength and increases aptitude, but chronic stress as is found in jobs reduces strength and increases mutations, depression and disease. In other words, our addiction to jobs has been gradually mutating us into depressive, wimpy, mentally addled and unhealthy people. That fits with what we see going on out there.

Jobs produce anti-V stress which has the effect of entropy on the human mind and body. This realization fits with the observed real-world effects of jobs, especially on women, which seem to result in social disorders and depression:

Ms. Komisar’s interest in early childhood development grew out of her three decades’ experience treating families, first as a clinical social worker and later as an analyst. “What I was seeing was an increase in children being diagnosed with ADHD and an increase in aggression in children, particularly in little boys, and an increase in depression in little girls.” More youngsters were also being diagnosed with “social disorders” whose symptoms resembled those of autism—“having difficulty relating to other children, having difficulty with empathy.”

As Ms. Komisar “started to put the pieces together,” she found that “the absence of mothers in children’s lives on a daily basis was what I saw to be one of the triggers for these mental disorders.” She began to devour the scientific literature and found that it reinforced her intuition.

We have to ask here if autism, a disorder present since birth, is the result of the absence of the mother, or stress on the mother because she is working. Exposed to constant workplace stress, and suffering the mutations and inflammation of that in addition to the consequences of a lifestyle which involves little time to maintain a home, comfortable eating and sleeping, mothers may be passing common mutations to their children.

Work induces a type of paranoia in us because the tasks we do are not really related to the actual task, the environment is hostile, and we have to guess as to what will be rewarded and often, find that this is entirely arbitrary. To work around these events, people at jobs tend to put in longer hours and do extra work to cover all contingencies, forgetting that none of this is needed or helpful; it only exists for them to advance their careers, their managers to do the same and shareholders to have confidence in their investment in the company.

Notice how happiness peaks after retirement:

Jobs brought the downfall of the West. They make life subtly miserable, so that we feel it is improper to outright complain, especially since we have it better than others. But we notice that our irreplaceable time is slipping away and we are spending it on nonsense and appearance, and this induces resentment, instability, and hopelessness.

Western men became domesticated because jobs took over their lives. Originally, people cared for their own homestead and had some kind of calling — carpenter, farmer, hunter, soldier, priest, shoemaker — which ensured that they had money to use for what they could not produce at their home farms.

But then, for people at the top, society became administrative as, thanks to advances in medicine and hygiene, the lower echelons of society swelled in number. This introduced a managerial type of society where a few smart people dedicated most of their time to reigning in the burgeoning masses, who like all lower-IQ people were highly individualistic and thus acted in chaotic ways, requiring restraint.

Once the West declared “freedom” and “equality” to be its goals, this process accelerated even further.

At this point, jobs have dominated the West and with them, through the denial of inner traits, the use of external manipulation has essentially domesticated and infantilized people, increasing atomization by eliminating ways that they can actually trust others. Now we are all actors on stage.

Jobs take up all of our time. Your average person prepares for an hour in the morning, commutes for another half hour, then stays late in order to qualify for a promotion. When they get home, after another half-hour commute, they are thinking about work and what people said and did. At this point, they have only a few hours before they must go to sleep, get up and do it the next day, for at least 71% of the days of the week.

When the weekend comes, this person is unprepared. Two whole days, with at least half of the first one taken up with filing taxes, researching new products, home repairs, stocking up on groceries, studying for a certification for work, fixing broken gadgets, cleaning the house, taking the pets to the vet, ferrying children to activities, doing laundry, paying bills, and a few thousand other little tasks that eat time and leave the person somewhat stranded.

On top of that, the conditioning kicks in. People whose days are marked by routine and external obligation suddenly have no idea what to do with themselves when they do have free time. As a result, the weekend presents stress as well: it is rare time, precious and necessary, but as people with no idea how to best spend that time, most people end up uncertain as to what to do, and as a result, wasting their time on what other people seem to be doing even if it does not fit them.

This psychological conditioning spreads through all aspects of life. Domesticated people cannot thinking critically, cannot analyze and cannot make decisions of their own; they always defer to the group, and then feel cheated because the results that work for an average person rarely work for any given individual. In politics, such as when they vote, or in personal behaviors, they emulate others, and then end up feeling terrible about the time they seem to have no control over, slipping through their fingers.

It is not surprising that a population subjected to jobs is deteriorating:

Data released last week suggest Americans’ health is declining and millions of middle-age workers face the prospect of shorter, and less active, retirements than their parents enjoyed.

The U.S. age-adjusted mortality rate—a measure of the number of deaths per year—rose 1.2 percent from 2014 to 2015, according to the Society of Actuaries. That’s the first year-over-year increase since 2005, and only the second rise greater than 1 percent since 1980.

…For those with a retirement age of 66, 11 percent already had some kind of dementia or other cognitive decline at age 58 to 60, according to the study. That’s up from 9.5 percent of Americans just a few years older, with a retirement age between 65 and 66.

Cognitive decline and increased mortality from disease are consistent with the stress-induced inflammation and genetic mutation that is discussed above. Although our minds are conditioned not to see it because we worship work as a means of being equal citizens, the theory lines up with reality.

Despite having all of our technology, wealth, and power, we are still working long hours in stressful conditions making ourselves neurotic. We are driven by a sense of labor by the pound, or what the employer is willing to pay for, instead of results, which are discerned in finer measurements and regulated not by the power of the manager, the shareholder or the employee but by the market, which is part of that scary Real World which reacts to what we do, often not in the ways we intended.

We live in a bubble: between the time when we act, and the time when results appear, managers and shareholders and the buying public reward us. Our social group claps us on that back and says attaboy. The money flows in, and then only later do we see the actual consequences. This insulates us from ever being really wrong, and allows for almost everyone to stay employed with no risk.

This creates false productivity based on the amount of economic activity we generate within the time-span of the bubble, not how much actual value we produce. This corresponds to the general link in humanity between solipsism and socialization where as long as we generate a buzz among others, we are seen as successful, because a self-referential society cares only about shared feelings and perceptions, not real productivity because as a society we are wealthy enough that the bread and steaks will keep coming no matter what we do.

As a result, people have found that the more hours they work, the more false productivity is created, and so they are essentially forced to work long hours for monetary reward despite this being, in the long term, economically irrelevant:

Recently, economists at Purdue and the University of Copenhagen made a clever attempt to clear up the question. They looked at Danish manufacturing companies where overseas sales increased unexpectedly because of changes in foreign demand or transportation costs between 1996 and 2006. These constituted a set of natural experiments. At firms where exports spiked, there was suddenly a lot more work to do, a lot more things to sell. This put the squeeze on employees, who became measurably more productive — but also started to have more health problems.

“The medical literature typically finds that people who work longer hours have worse health outcomes — but we try to distinguish between causality and correlation,” said Chong Xiang, an economics professor at Purdue and co-author on the paper, along with David Hummels and Jakob Munch. A draft was released this week by the National Bureau for Economic Research.

…If external forces caused a company’s exports to rise by, say, 10 percent, female employees were about 2.5 percent more likely to be treated for severe depression, and 7.7 percent more likely to take heart attack or stroke drugs. For context, about 4 percent of women overall were being treated for severe depression and 1 percent of women were on heart attack or stroke medication. These conditions are not very common, but job strain caused a measurable, statistically significant bump in prevalence.

In other words, the more you work, the less healthy you are. The more you succeed, the more likely you are to become sick, sterile and non compos mentis. The more you rely on your economy to guide you, the more it will lead you to doom; the more you rely on what other people think, the more you will be forced to go through mindless rituals of no significance.

We see an insight into The Human Problem through this. Like our fast money policies, it relies on a self-referential measurement, or assessing what placates the group (socialization, utilitarianism, rationalization) rather than what achieves the right results in reality, because the latter cannot be universally assessed.

This internal measurement leads to us chasing phantoms, such as measurements of productivity instead of productivity itself, and these are rewarded because other people are deciding what should be rewarded and they are using the same measurements. However, the map is not the territory… and the sensation is not the reality. This creates a spiral of unreality where what makes others feel safe, whether managers or shareholders, becomes the new reality, and the actual reality is forgotten.

It is no surprise that most people feel their jobs are pointless and that this increases the farther up in the hierarchy you go. We are a society dedicated toward nonsense work because it is not purposive toward a goal, but is designed as appearance, to make others feel good about the situation and therefore, to reward those doing the nonsense “work.”

In a 2013 survey of 12,000 professionals by the Harvard Business Review, half said they felt their job had no “meaning and significance,” and an equal number were unable to relate to their company’s mission, while another poll among 230,000 employees in 142 countries showed that only 13% of workers actually like their job. A recent poll among Brits revealed that as many as 37% think they have a job that is utterly useless.

This is consistent with other even more cynical measurements which found that most Americans are not “present” at work because the work they are doing is unrelated to reality:

More broadly, just 30 percent of employees in America feel engaged at work, according to a 2013 report by Gallup. Around the world, across 142 countries, the proportion of employees who feel engaged at work is just 13 percent. For most of us, in short, work is a depleting, dispiriting experience, and in some obvious ways, it’s getting worse.

In other words, most people know that their jobs are pointless, but by the same token, they still suffer the stress of these jobs which cannot be unrelated to the lack of utility and purpose of those jobs. Thus, like patients strapped to a gurney and bled out via a transfusion line, the average modern person knows that they are engaged in nothing of value but are dependent on it, so suffer stress and the existential void of knowing they are wasting their time on nonsense to appease the lower echelons of society. They are slaves, sacrifices and scapegoats, these workers.

The real crisis of this is that the penalty falls unequally. The intelligent realize their time is being wasted, become despairing and die out; fools who have nothing better to do see nothing wrong, and so thrive despite being in horrible circumstances. Jobs create a dysgenic force that rewards the fool and punishes the intelligent.

The intelligent, in contrast to those who must spend their time fascinated by what others do, require more time outside of work to organize their thoughts and gain clarity on what is vital:

Findings from a US-based study seem to support the idea that people with a high IQ get bored less easily, leading them to spend more time engaged in thought.

And active people may be more physical as they need to stimulate their minds with external activities, either to escape their thoughts or because they get bored quickly.

More intelligent people require more time to think, and jobs interrupt this by spamming their most active hours with tasks that have nothing to do with reality, and therefore, baffle the mind with nonsense.

This explains the downfall of civilizations: as they grow, the upper echelons become dedicated to their maintenance, taking on roles that stultify them, stress them, mutate them and make them ill. It is no wonder that every human civilization has failed; they have self-destructed through the black magic of jobs.

As conservatives, or those who conserve the best of the past and carry it forward into the future, we must address the crisis of jobs: mutations, disease, boredom, domestication, and existential misery.

Our most direct attack comes through replacing the false managerial hierarchy of “accountability” with something more exact, namely a hierarchy that addresses results in reality. This requires — gods forbid! — slowing down our cycle of perception and waiting for actual results to appear instead of using the social measurement of intermediate targets.

This requires us to do away with the illusion of meritocracy, or the idea that we can take “equal” humans and test them to determine who is good. This measures only external attributes like obedience, and misses out on the need to find out what people are made of within so that they do not have to be constantly monitored and penalized for not meeting the token objectives required by a meritocratic system.

In an indirect way, “work hard, pray hard” is a confirmation of egalitarianism: it holds that we are all equal and that the differences between us consist of how hard we work and how righteously we behave, when in fact intelligence matters more than labor by the pound in terms of results, and righteous behavior arises from the ability to understand why morality and qualitative improvement are important. But for those wielding “work hard, pray hard,” this pragma enables them to both deflect challenges to their possessions — “I worked hard for this!” — and to subtly explain themselves as morally superior, because after all, they worked harder and prayed harder than others, therefore if those are their values, they deserve what they have, and they can explain it without the socially-unpopular but realistic notion that some are born smarter and better than others.

Instead of having this indirection work against us, we can make it work for us by instead acknowledging that humanity is an evolutionary struggle between our smarter people and our dumber ones. The lower echelons will always be destructive because they cannot understand anything above their station, therefore will see it as unnecessary; much as the third world is the most individualistic place on Earth, our own homegrown proles are more individualistic and thus greedy, selfish, solipsistic, corrupt and perverse than those above them.

The Human Problem occurs whenever a group of humans form because social pressures reward accepting the stupid and including it, instead of following the law of nature, where a group that excels will break away. This social pressure exists because of fear of the herd; if a smarter group breaks away, it will be by the law of quality-versus-quantity less numerous than the herd, and the herd will then show up and dominate through superior numbers. Even highly proficient and trained soldiers cannot overcome odds of twelve-to-one or greater, which was the lesson of WW2 and perhaps why the world shifted so hard Left afterwards; the Left pacifies the herd by including them, and then allows the wealthy to buy their way into the good graces of the herd, although this backfires because then the herd controls the elites.

Once we accept that we are not equal, and that some are better than others by virtue of having greater force of intellect and force of character in parallel, meaning that both are required — this filters out the dot-com “geniuses” and clever shopkeepers — we can set up a hierarchy where the levels of society are acknowledged. This takes the form of both an aristocratic hierarchy, and caste levels to society; at the very top are the people who make decisions for the culture, and these tend to — in the way of actual genius, not the fake genius of the dot-com boffins and clever merchants — focus on qualitative improvement instead of “new” unproven theories. Slightly below them are the good and decent people, and these become local leaders through the manorial system. Only this reverses the problem of human decline, which occurs through the war of the many less-bright against the honest and decent brights who create and develop civilization.

Hierarchies of this nature lead to the manorial system as we see in the classic cultures of Western Europe and the ancient lands of Rome and Greece:

the manor system in core austrasia changed pretty rapidly (already by the 500s) to one in which the lord of the manor (who might’ve been an abbot in a monastery) distributed farms to couples for them to work independently in exchange for a certain amount of labor on the lord’s manor (the demesne). this is what’s known as bipartite manorialism. and from almost the beginning, then, bipartite manorialism pushed the population into nuclear families, which may for some generations have remained what i call residential nuclear families (i.e. residing as a conjugal couple, but still having regular contact and interaction with extended family members). over the centuries, however, these became the true, atomized nuclear families that characterize northwest europe today.

for the first couple (few?) hundred years of this manor system, sons did not necessarily inherit the farms that their fathers worked. when they came of age, and if and when a farm on the manor became available, a young man — and his new wife (one would not marry before getting a farm — not if you wanted to be a part of the manor system) — would be granted the rights to another farm. (peasants could also, and did, own their own private property — some more than others — but this varied in place and time.) over time, this practice changed as well, and eventually peasant farms on manors became virtually hereditary. (i’m not sure when this change happened, though — i still need to find that out.) finally, during the high middle ages (1100s-1300s) the labor obligations of peasants were phased out and it became common practice for farmers simply to pay rent to the manor lords.

In other words, there was always a higher-IQ lord who could regulate the peasants, and by restricting resources in the form of land, keep their population down and keep them from forming the thronging masses that the Greeks recognized arose in cities, and quickly adopted the characteristics of herd rule. Since the lords owned all the land, any activity on that land had to be approved by a lord, and pay tax to that lord, insuring that any wealth generated would then be put back into the community through the hands of the people least likely to waste it.

Manorialism and hierarchy improve jobs by limiting them. Perhaps future corporations will be located on manors, and each corporation will have an assigned lord on whose land they dwell, and shareholders will be limited to those of the upper classes, which will avoid the “race to the bottom” that occurs where corporations compete merely in terms of popularity, which grants them the media mentions and trend buzz required to wake up a population to their products despite being as a population over-saturated in terms of product options, advertising, trends and other distractions.

A social order of this nature also limits social mobility which means that people will stop constantly agitating for more money and power as a means of raising social status. In addition, it restricts commercial impulses — shopkeeping, merchants and other clever people — by placing them firmly among the lower castes, albeit a high lower caste, and by doing so removes the focus on work, money and commerce to the point that it takes over society, such as we see in Western “civilization” today.

In addition, by concentrating wealth among those who are most discerning, this type of community order enables civilization to pay people to do unprofitable things like make great art instead of pop culture, curate ancient ruins, care for forests, watch over lonely places, keep spaces clean and engage in cultural activity, customs and events.

We can see remnants of this ancient order in the UK, where the lords owned all the land and preserved huge amounts of it in its natural state as “hunting preserves” which were infrequently used. This created a vast “green belt” across the nation where wildlife was safe at least on the population level — if you did not mind a few dead foxes here and there — and interrupted the constant growth of cities and suburbs like a cancer spreading across the land.

By relaxing the pressures and attitudes that create modern jobs, the caste/aristocracy/manor way of life makes jobs more pleasing and less likely to take up all of our time. Medieval peasants spent a fraction of the time working that we do now, and more time living; aristocrats as well, the people who by their greater intelligence need more time off to simply learn how to think and refresh their core of wisdom, spent less time engaged in frustrating baby-sitting and more time connecting to the ideas behind culture, the reasons why that have to be re-learned every generation because they cannot be conveyed in written text.

Only when combined threats — Mongol invasions, plagues, religious division, Islamic invasions, wars — destabilized the aristocracy did the clever-but-not-bright middle classes manage to buy themselves into the power system and then weaponize the proles against the aristocrats. The Church facilitated this by trying to be a dual system of power to that of the kings, and in so doing, fragmented the power of the kings and let evil in through the back door.

As anyone who studies The Human Problem knows, this problem repeats itself time and again in all human organizations, or groups of more than two people. Unless a hierarchy is established, the rest oppress the best, and because this mass are not the best, they make increasingly horrible decisions. Every civilization dies by suicide resulting for collective insanity as people contort their thinking to fit what is popular, and the whole society goes over the cliff chasing an illusion, a phantom, an oasis and a chimera.

Reversing the progress of The Human Problem also frees us from mass culture, where whatever pleases the largest group wins out and so a “race to the bottom” exists for the most venal, crass and debasing “art” because that is what is profitable. This in turn generates a trend-based culture where each group, including corporations, hopes for the “big score” that comes with creating something that is vastly popular and becomes a trend. When these fads go big, they follow an arc by which The Human Problem ultimately infiltrates them from within, which makes profit for those who get in early and sell out right before the peak, but then bankrupts anyone who hangs on to the asset. The best example of this so far may be MySpace, which at its peak sold for $500m only to be worth $50m a few years later.

We have learned from modern time that we cannot use formal organization to tame our problems because it is too easily gamed. The rules, laws, incentives, punishments and procedures only take effect after a crisis have occurred, and so represent attempts to fix effects directly instead of looking to their underlying causes in the moments leading up to the creation of the disaster. Jobs fit within this perfectly well: to improve workplaces, we regulate workplaces, instead of looking at the underlying pressures that create them in the form we see them.

Conservatives, if they stay true to their principles, must realize that our society began failing for existential reasons and crept away from virtue in order to pacify the herd, include everyone, and try to replicate classical civilization by instead relying on mobilized masses. This mass culture creates the horror that is jobs/work, and to undo it, we must reverse its causes and focus on hierarchy instead of equality, because equality creates conformity and makes us treat ourselves as products on an assembly line, and it is from this outward-in order of regulated herd behavior that the horror of the workplace arises.

Antiwork: Bureaucracy, Not Capitalism, Is Crushing Your Soul Through Jobs

Saturday, September 2nd, 2017

Antiwork conservatives must hide their sentiments the most when among other conservatives because antiwork — or at least, a movement for the lessening of work and improvement of the existential experience of work — clashes with the “work hard, pray hard” mentality of mainstream conservatives.

The Right, knowing that it lost in 1789 with the French Revolution and that its basic outlook requires an overthrow of everything from The Enlightenment™ forward, has adopted a defensive stance, in which members rationalize their inaction by claiming to be morally superior to others because they “do the right thing.” This cedes the field to the crazies and is why conservatism always loses.

Joe Average Conservative looks at the world, sees a ruin, and so decides that the only way he can feel good about himself and his society is to argue to himself that if he just does the right thing, eventually there will be a mass awakening and people will mass convert to his values. These mass awakenings never happen, but this lets Joe make it through the day feeling alright about himself.

Claiming these higher values allows him to feel better than other people, which is how he compensates for knowing that the herd has won, and that it is destroying all good things and replacing them with gunk. He does not realize that by arguing this, he has already internalized equality, which forbids anything but personal activities because we would never want to be like the kings, who told us all what to do.

But, if we look closely into work, we see that it is misery, as a recent RAND poll reveals:

• Nearly one in five workers — a share the study calls “disturbingly high” — say they face a hostile or threatening environment at work, which can include sexual harassment and bullying. Workers who have to face customers endure a disproportionate share of abuse.

• Nearly 55% say they face “unpleasant and potentially hazardous” conditions.

• Nearly three quarters say they spend at least a fourth of their time on the job in “intense or repetitive physical” labor. “I was surprised at how physically demanding jobs were,” said lead author Nicole Maestas, a Harvard Medical School economist.

• Telecommuting is rare: 78% say they are required to be present in their workplace during working hours.

• Only 38% say their jobs offer good prospects for advancement. And the older they get, the less optimistic they become.

• About half say they work on their own time to meet the demands of their job.

In other words, people are getting demolished by their jobs. After a day of this, most people are going to go home, pop open twelve watery beers, and watch television while trying to forget that their lives are finite, wasted and meaningless. Join that knowledge with the awareness that real wages have been stagnant since the 1970s, and you can spot a formula for misery.

A conservative approach to work would have one guiding rule: efficiency. It would do this because in the conservative goal, hard work is a useful pursuit if it is also useful work, as otherwise it is a conceit, fetish or excuse. Anything that is not strictly necessary can be discarded, and anything that can be done better, faster or with less effort, should be done that way.

The point of this is to give people more time. Right now, they come home tired and waste their time, then have no idea what to do with themselves on the weekend. With more time, they will realize that their distractions are not actually that distracting, and start to look elsewhere for something to not just fill the time, but make it meaningful, as otherwise its passage will be difficult.

In those extra hours, people come to know themselves and their motivation. Most people are strangers to themselves, having been distracted or occupied since a young age, and have no idea why they do anything they do. From this, they seek other strangers, and soon have families and friends who are mysteries to them.

Human souls are like gardens. They need space to grow, time and energy, nourishment and water. Without those, the plants grow stunted and exhausted, much like the people who trudge through life like zombies, irate at any deviation from the norm because they are barely able to handle that and any variation threatens their fragile stability.

Work shows us that as any organization gets large enough, it succumbs to The Human Problem, which is that over time any group becomes inverted in purpose as it changes itself to accommodate the wider and less selective group that it requires to grow. Organizations lose sight of their own purpose as they attempt to manage themselves and become accessible to the herd.

When that happens, people arrive who do not understand the original purpose. Because it is a mystery to them, they hate it, and act against it by laboring so that they do what benefits them instead of the purpose of the organization. This is why managers pump up their statistics and then move on to new jobs, leaving a mess behind when the deception is uncovered, and why most workers are diligent about going through the motions but lazy about qualitative concerns and detail management.

They are not all sociopaths, although many of the rank and file are so selfish as to be de facto sociopaths, and some of the leaders are also sociopathic. This selfishness is nurtured by the conditions set up by the system: when the purpose is clear and the group is small, the best can be rewarded and the rest excluded, but when the organization is large, the primary concern becomes keeping it together (“we must all get along”), and so obedience is rewarded more than ability.

Accountability makes this worse. Managers fear those above them and others in the committee room, and so they pay more attention to appearance than reality, which requires obedient if not outright oblivious employees in order to perpetuate the fiction. Such managers choose obedient little tools who are easily replaced in order to keep their control absolute, much like democracy does.

The Human Problem shows us that no matter what “system” we employ, if we do not create a hierarchy of the best people, purpose becomes inverted. Soviet Communism and capitalist corporations undergo the same process, as even volunteer and social groups do. Any organization which does not actively create a hierarchy of the best becomes dedicated to the worst.

In our current world of work, there are many problems. We have too many people in the office, including women and foreigners. There are too many rules, triplicate forms, red tape requirements and legal fears. But most importantly, our entire economy is based upon appearance so that individuals can get promoted, and their lack of allegiance to purpose means that all of our time is wasted, making us miserable.

How Jobs Crush Your Soul

Tuesday, July 25th, 2017

Recent reading here has included John Muir, whose works I had not picked up for decades. In one passage, he describes how repetitive labor destroys humanity and makes them vengeful:

As for the shepherd, his case is still worse, especially in winter when he lives alone in a cabin. For, though stimulated at times by hopes of one day owning a flock and getting rich like his boss, he at the same time is likely to be degraded by the life he leads, and seldom reaches the dignity or advantage—or disadvantage—of ownership. The degradation in his case has for cause one not far to seek. He is solitary most of the year, and solitude to most people seems hard to bear. He seldom has much good mental work or recreation in the way of books. Coming into his dingy hovel-cabin at night, stupidly weary, he finds nothing to balance and level his life with the universe. No, after his dull drag all day after the sheep, he must get his supper; he is likely to slight this task and try to satisfy his hunger with whatever comes handy. Perhaps no bread is baked; then he just makes a few grimy flapjacks in his unwashed frying-pan, boils a handful of tea, and perhaps fries a few strips of rusty bacon. Usually there are dried peaches or apples in the cabin, but he hates to be bothered with the cooking of them, just swallows the bacon and flapjacks, and depends on the genial stupefaction of tobacco for the rest. Then to bed, often without removing the clothing worn during the day. Of course his health suffers, reacting on his mind; and seeing nobody for weeks or months, he finally becomes semi-insane or wholly so.

Jobs reduce human beings to functions, where being the proprietor of a farm or business involves multiple functions and a sense of responsibility, not obligation. The healthiest society may be one where each person owns something, if only as a serf paying rents to a lord, and is guided to make it succeed as a whole, instead of being placed in charge of a single function which rapidly becomes repetitive.

How To Survive Working For The Sex-Starved Cobra

Saturday, July 8th, 2017

Most people who are fairly academic and who steer themselves towards a White Collar Office Job will have it easier. I think this is unfair. But I also don’t give a rat’s rear-end. I got my White Privelege Visa the old-fashoned way. I studied my ass off. If you want it easy like me, join me in solving for the oscillation of a circular membrane using Legendre Polynomials.* At least I had it easy until I got the wife, the mortgage, the kids and then had to work for The Evil Sex-Starved Cobra Boss for a five year stretch.

The house, the kids, and usually even the lovely wife were delightful additions to my previously minimal and basic existence. The downside of all this is that it tied me down. Then the Sex-Starved Cobra got assigned to be my supervisor. I couldn’t just pop the rip-cord and ditch the job and apartment. I was there and I didn’t have an escape hatch. The weaselly little SOB had me where he wanted me, and used the position to humiliate me in every endeavor.

The problem was this. He had fallen very badly from grace in his previous office and was given the position over myself as a somewhat soft crash-landing. His initial problem arose from the fact that he fvcked under the flag-pole.** He then promoted his loathsome little hoochie-hole far beyond her level of competence, spent far beyond his financial means, fathered two children, and then had his best buddy explain…

You see, she was porking two other guys on the side and was in an existential dilemma deciding which of her cabana boys she intended to dump him for when she monkey-branched like the thot that she truly was. He then, regrettably remodeled himself as a man after the chisel-wielding (((divorce attorney))) from Hell. So what did his ex do? Sent him to work to make all her alimony payments. That, along with the personal bankruptcy filing and the forced sale of his home and the hostile custody arrangement involving his two kids had him looking for someone’s ass to rip into like a grizzly bear. And that turned him into the shining piece of humanity that I then spent the next five years working for/job hunting under.

Getting physically cucked makes a man ultimately insecure to the core. You can no longer master yourself and therefore can’t lead others without malice in your heart. It didn’t help that I’ve managed to remain a workout fanatic pretty far into my middle ages. I never tried to wield Golic’s Hammer on his ass, but it was unspoken every time I stepped into his office. He, meanwhile was getting his stomach stapled because he had been digging his grave with the fork, knife and spoon. He hated watching a man two years older than him walk into his office with a a set of clothes that properly fit.

I remember one time this woman I was buddies with anyway innocently flirted with me while he and I were meeting with her. He was completely vile and hostile to me for the next three days. He threatened not to sign a leave slip so I could go to the eye doctor. I asked him how it would look if I had to go up the chain of command just to get my frikking glasses checked. Not professional on my part, even if I say so myself, but I was ready to choke the bastard.

Then he started stocking the office with his old cronies from his days of being a bigshot. At that point, none of the rest of us got to know what was going on and had to start reporting to his detestable flunkies. They’d hang out in his office and shoot the shit all day and if you came in they looked at you like you didn’t belong in the frat house. Every now and then, these sleazy catamites would stroll around and look at what was on our computer screens or ask us how our projects were coming. I had an ongoing joke with Brad, the dude who sat in the cube next door.

Brad: “Are you being paranoid again?”

Me: “Yep, but am I paranoid enough?”

Brad: “Probably not.”

And that’s how it is when your office has its own Stazi. That’s how it is when they ask you to construct a $40 billion cost estimate and then defend all of its assumptions and mathematics while not trusting you enough to sign your medical leave so that you can get your frikking glasses checked. The experience made me less of a decent person to others around me. I was usually mad as hell. I drank way to much to make that bastard die out of my brain when he wasn’t around. The only positive externality occurred when I ran or attacked the gym. Oh yes, I set PRs.

And he knew good and well that I was trying like heck to get away from him. He sabotaged me on recommendations. He was very good at wording things that sounded good on the surface but were absolute career poison pills to have on any sort of an eval.

“Is generally personally responsible and usually maintains a professional bearing and appearance.”
“Can be brilliantly effective and mostly cares intensely about his work.”

I had to challenge his evaluations and start asking him, “When was I not motivated? In what ways have my appearance and bearing appeared unprofessional?” He would back down and reword it in a less poisonous manner when I called him on his passive-aggressive bullcrap. When you work for a human ball of pissed-off insecurity, you have to constantly stand guard against his efforts to tear you down and degrade you for the sake of his own personal validation.

He eventually married another woman. Older than him and adorned with “tramp-stamp” tattoos. He couldn’t even go to his church to marry her. He had her knocked-up with twins less than four months after the broom-jumping. From what I gleaned, they were already arguing about two months after the bundles of joy were born. The positive aspect of that is that he backed off of people and stopped screwing me on job recommendations. An old friend from a prior project upped me in big way and got me out of there.

So we now reach the part of this whole 5-Year Jerry Springer episode where the perv ringmaster with the microphone asks, “What can we all learn from this?” Here’s what we can take away.

1) People like The Evil Sex-Starved Cobra Boss From Gehenna are less stable that decent, ordinary humans. They do great damage, but they burn against the friction of reality like a meteor flying through the sky. The will probably chill out or burn out before you do. You can bite your tongue and ride them out.

2) You have to protect yourself at all times. The key question Brad asked me in his joking, but not just kidding sort of way was “Are you being paranoid again?” What that meant in plain English was “Is your guard up?” You have to read every line of every paper, document or email a person composes involving you. They are evil. They will backstab you and sabotage you. They will hate you for being there and resent you for being sane and therefore trying to leave.***

3) Avoid ever reminding that sort of person of what they truly are? Do not show them up and stay quietly humble. Avoid contact with them and anyone stupid, or evil enough to spend a lot of time with this individual. Nobody honest or likeable will actively seek to spend time around this man socially. Consider it a litmus test. If they act like they admire the Cobra Boss, you can not trust them any further than you could projectile-crap them.

4) Re-connect with professional friends in your line of work. If you try to job hunt, this man will assassinate you with passive-aggressive faint praise. You need someone’s word to countermand whatever this guy says about you over the phone to a perspective employer. Also, find ways to sharpen your skills through work projects. This SOB will not let you attend any really useful professional training. You have to train yourself.

5) Separate a heck of a lot of yourself from your work life. I got better at brewing beer. I taught a group young kids about the Bible and helped coach the heck out of two Little League Baseball Teams that my boy played for. I blogged more than rational human beings should be permitted to blog. These things gave me an outlet to contribute to the world. A man at my age and phase of life I had to go outside myself and believe I could give something back. It sure wasn’t happening down on the cube farm.

6) Remember God is more important than bullshit at work. Your prayers won’t always be answered. God will sometimes say “No” until he and you are ready for what comes next.

7) Think carefully before you take that Kierkegaardian Leap and assume the burdens of fatherhood, matrimony, home ownership and a career path. These things give you a lot and can be very fulfilling. They can also tie you down and leave you vulnerable. Just like I was vulnerable. Do better than I did at sorting out your life in a way so that you can pick up stakes and leave when you get trapped like I did. This is one area where MGTOWs might even have a point.


*Come and Git Some! (You’ll have mathematical understanding of why Keith Moon could play the hell out of drum set.)

** – Boned a woman who worked for him. Life lesson: Keep income and pooney-tang in seperate categories.

*** – If that sounded totally jacked up, that just means you read the sentence correctly. Bravo on the reading comprehension.

In Praise Of Leisure

Saturday, June 10th, 2017

Modern society is based on the worker. Leftists harp on worker equality and want to send everyone to a job; mainstream conservatives (blight) parrot the same old tired dodge about waving the flag, going to church and working hard.

We might ask instead why jobs are so important. They provide income, but so does having a trade or business. Mostly, they are useful for turning cities into human factories where raw material is educated, indoctrinated and then sent off to do repetitive tasks, most of which are either not useful or for unnecessary business activities designed to signal the necessity of the personnel involved.

In other words, jobs are a method of control. They keep the population from engaging in rebellion by both making them dependent and giving them a sense of place and an activity to keep them occupied during the day. Perhaps that is why they refer to job titles as “occupation.”

But to a realist, jobs are only useful insofar as they achieve something necessary. Otherwise, people need time to become whole people — the opposite of factory people — by having the time for contemplating life, interacting with family and friends, exploring culture and really, just bumbling around and engaging in the pleasures, pitfalls and most of all, learning experiences of life.

Jobs destroy our souls.

Consider what jobs are designed to minimize, the development of intelligent people into people with depth so they can apply that intelligence instead of frittering it away on entertainment, workplace politics, shopping and alcohol:

New research seems to prove the theory that brainy people spend more time lazing around than their active counterparts.

Findings from a US-based study seem to support the idea that people with a high IQ get bored less easily, leading them to spend more time engaged in thought.

And active people may be more physical as they need to stimulate their minds with external activities, either to escape their thoughts or because they get bored quickly.

Jobs are designed to interrupt thinking. Not only are they repetitive, driving people into a stupor, but they are filled with interruptions and based on social behavior instead of functional, goal-driven behavior. It is more important to act as a good employee than to achieve the objectives of the business.

This keeps people compliant, which grants security to those above them, which is a tactic found in most dictatorships and third world countries. When people are busy and worried, they leave the power structure alone, which is what it wants, because it is addicted to power for the sake of power itself; this is the opposite of an aristocracy, which sees power as a means-to-an-end of achieving the best possible society and through it, the best possible life for individuals, each according to his own level in the hierarchy of natural ability.

Feudalism was more honest. It gave people roles, and then granted them most of their time to spend on life itself. They were lazy, maybe; they may have wasted much of that time on wine, women, food and song, but even those became more advanced as a result. Even so, their excess time led to more moments spent contemplating existence and finding comfort in it.

More intelligent people tend to be “lazy” because they spend more time thinking. This enables them to broaden their thinking and consider the “big questions” such as human purpose and the nature of the universe. That thinking contributes to the “reflective” nature of Western Civilization, where each thing had purpose toward a much broader and intangible goal.

Houellebecq On The Emptiness Of “Careers”

Saturday, May 20th, 2017

This one has been making the rounds, but, it serves as an observation that modern life leaves nothing for the future especially in careers:

Children existed solely to inherit a man’s trade, his moral code and his property. This was taken for granted among the aristocracy, but merchants, craftsmen and peasants also bought into the idea, so it became the norm at every level of society. That’s all gone now: I work for someone else, I rent my apartment from someone else, there’s nothing for my son to inherit. I have no craft to teach him, I haven’t a clue what he might do when he’s older. By the time he grows up, the rules I lived by will have no value—he will live in another universe. If a man accepts the fact that everything must change, then he accepts that life is reduced to nothing more than the sum of his own experience; past and future generations mean nothing to him. That’s how we live now. For a man to bring a child into the world now is meaningless.

Jobs make you into a robot. Aristocracy makes each person have a place without being equal. One does not work at all, but the other mostly works. Even when it fails, it is better off that its alternative in the long term.

Instead, we get the standard human behavior: a compromise, more aimed at reducing risk to the present tense than creating something positive in the future tense.

Jobs are jails. Democracy is slavery. Socialism is control. Until we overthrow these things that “seem” good but are actually toxic, we are doomed to live among our own failures.

True Minimum Wage

Friday, May 19th, 2017

It is the considered editorial opinion* at Amerika that work, yea verily, doth suck. It kills the soul and sucks the marrow out its bones. It keeps you in your shaved monkey pen, off the streets and out of trouble for eight to ten hours of the day. It kills time. In the words of The Great Henry David Thoreau; this wounds eternity. Please be friendly and don’t wound eternity.

Another aspect of work is that it is both randomly and deterministically unfair. It is randomly unfair because you can prepare all day long for the interview, the sales pitch or the bigshot briefing and then get railed by the nefarious forces with which Murphy rides to war. The game never ends when your whole world depends on the turn of a friendly card.

Work also sucks because the deck can be deterministically stacked against you. Ask the Asian American High School Valedictorian applying to Harvard what I mean by that. It doesn’t matter how good you are, how hard you work how badly you want it. If you are not the Government’s kind, then you succeeding, you getting ahead, you affording that dream home, or you bringing home the bacon to momma has a disparate impact and must be prevented.

Afterall, no matter how hard you bust that @$$, ¡YOU DIDN’T BUILD THAT! The pathetic, envying socialist grubs will never let you enjoy the just rewards of your efforts or achievements. They hate your guts for having that will to power and that drive to succeed.

Do well at work and the ankle-biters will tax you, defame you, steal your ideas and work products and then drive that shiv hard between your vertabrae. The Post-Modern workplace is the vile, hive-infested anus of Amerikan social interaction. Work is where they tell you to do your d@mn job and then secretly fear and detest you if you are better at it than them.

And finally, after all of that, the economic world we live in is governed by unpitying, unbreakable laws that care as much for your existence as gravitation or the natural environment of The Great Plains. You are nothing in the economic world, just as you would be quickly obliterated if you were dumb enough to hike the surface of the moon in your Bermuda Shorts. And if you make like a weedy Dungeons and Dragons nerd and roll to disbelieve it gets worse. Way worse.

In an industry notorious for its “tight margins,” restaurants in San Francisco are closing their doors in record numbers thanks to the minimum wage hike. The minimum wage in San Francisco now stands at $13 per hour for low-skilled workers. Compare that to the $7.25 per hour federal minimum wage, or even the rest of California, which is at a $10.50 per hour minimum wage, and you can already start to see the problem.

There is a simple economic law here. You set your own minimum wage. It is based on your own skills and abilities. If you can’t get it done, they aren’t paying you for nothing. Senator Lieawatha approached it as a social problem and even wasted the time and electrons of the US Senate to ponder why the US Minimum Wage wasn’t $30/hour yet.

She needed to approach it as a sort of statistical mechanics problem instead. Within any given population, different members will have different personal characteristics. These characteristics will determine their suitability to the world of work. This will drive each individual to some minimum wage they are worthy of being hired at.

Artificially setting the minimum wage above the level of any percentage of this population will eventually tend to exclude them from the opportunity to consistently work. The businesses that would have previously hired them will either go under or replace human capital with robots or more efficient processing. At that juncture, the minimum wage for anyone in the working population below that artificial cut line will equal $0.00.

So we should hate the workplace. You are not just a slacker or a Leftard for feeling that way. You should hate war too. Particularly when they use live ammo. Your feelings are totally rational. On to question two: So what?

Let that question marinate in your minds and work towards developing the post-work society. We are going to get there eventually. I recommend we travel a different path to that destination than the one being undertaken in Venezuela or North Korea.


* — To the extent that we tolerate such things at Amerika

Affirmative Action Reveals Its Extortionate Nature

Monday, May 1st, 2017

According to the San Francisco Chronicle, diversity hiring has run into a snag: women and minorities leave jobs more frequently than others, and tend to blame the workplace for creating a hostile environment:

Women, blacks and Latinos are far more likely to quit jobs in tech than white or Asian men, according to a new report by the Kapor Center for Social Impact. The Oakland nonprofit commissioned an online survey by the Harris Poll, which asked 2,006 people who voluntarily left tech jobs in the past three years about why they quit. It found women were twice as likely to leave as men (alternative link), while black and Latino tech workers were 3.5 times likelier to quit than white or Asian colleagues. The most common reason they gave for their departures was workplace mistreatment.

Either all of these businesses are allowing “workplace mistreatment,” or as is more likely with human beings, people have figured out how to work the system. Affirmative Action means that competition for women and minorities enables them to get much higher salaries and be promoted beyond their actual qualifications. At that point, the winning move is to change jobs for more money and a new title.

In addition, these workers have a get-out-of-jail-free card, which is that if they claim mistreatment, companies will not criticize them because lawsuit dynamite has been created. This means that for them to make amazing money, all they need to do is get hired, and after a short time, claim mistreatment and move on to the next job, from which they can effectively not be fired.

Diversity has wrecked the West because by assuming that companies and individuals are in the wrong when something does not work out for a woman or minority person, our government and courts have created permanent entitlement positions which are being exploited because it is economically sensible for workers to do so. This raises costs, which are passed on to the consumer, and penalizes productive workers.

Civilization Space

Friday, February 24th, 2017

In the movie Office Space (itself perhaps a riff on the Michel Houellebecq book Whatever which came out a few years before it) the protagonist summarizes his working career to a psychologist with the following words:

So I’m sitting in my cubicle today and I realized that ever since I started working, every single day of my life has been worse than the day before it. So it means that every single day you see me, that’s on the worst day of my life.

Jobs are jails for a number of reasons. They are based on appearance, so everyone shows up regardless of whether there is a need or not. There is no purpose, because the task is defined by law and perceived demand, not necessity. At jobs, the dysfunction of other people comes out in the form of competition, with those who are most obedient and care least about efficient and meaningful use of time winning. And jobs are a form of control, or herding equal/interchangeable humans toward quasi-achievement by doing the same things in a mob assault. Jobs are spiritual death.

Then again, so is living in the post-collapse West.

Collapse is not an event. It is a process. It starts with slow corruption of what seems like an irrelevant detail, which is the first sign that vital knowledge has been lost, which in turn means that incompetents and neurotics have seized power. It slowly infiltrates everything, like a bacterial infection seeping into different tissues, because it corrupts language to pre-load all of the terms we use with the assumptions that rationalize collapse, like egalitarianism and tolerance (which equalizes good and bad). Then it becomes malignant as it turns those rationalizations into affirmative values, and actively reaches out for ever-increasing degrees of insanity as a means of distracting from the gaping void ahead.

In the West, each year is worse than the year before it. The changes are subtle, but they never reverse. So it means that every single year that we are here is the worst year of our lives.

The root of the problem is the thronging herd. Any time one person makes a change for the better, like Donald J. Trump or Nigel Farage, the herd creates an equal and opposite reaction in favor of degeneracy and pretentious false good things. The herd is composed of individuals, and individuals value breakdown of society because it makes individuals proportionately more powerful and camouflages their personal failings amidst a background of social chaos. But because such thinking requires denial of the role that nature, natural mathematical order, and civilization play in enabling the individual to not just act but act realistically and toward qualitative improvement, we refer to that thinking as hubris or solipsism. It is a pretentious overinflated sense of self-worth.

Each year, the people know more words and less critical thinking; the art and culture shows more flesh and flash but less aptitude for evoking a feeling of the significance of life and its meaning. Each year, the leaders are more polished and less able to respond with anything but clichés to the inevitable stream of repetitive events. The quality of everything declines where, as if to compensate, the quantity surges, meaning that we get a whole lot of nothing important at all. Most of our hours are wasted on nonsense, from jobs that do not need doing to bureaucracy, lines, glitches, and constant incompetence.

Western Civilization lies adrift in the throes of entropy, or the inevitable decay which — unless countered by an organizing force — reduces all things to an equal lowest common denominator. This state, known as “heat death,” consists of an equal distribution of energy among those granular units, meaning that every action yields roughly the same benefit, which means that choice has become irrelevant. This is the state the human mind secretly desires because in this state, there is no social status hierarchy or right/wrong. Everything is equally right and wrong, meaning neither. There is no way to screw up, or to be seen as worth ostracizing, because everything is accepted and so nothing is worth anything. Time slows to a crawl, and the world becomes grey and listless like a miscegenated race.

If the Alt Right has a mission statement, it is this: restore Western Civilization. We, unlike the herds of denial-bound daytime TV watchers, recognize that The Fall has occurred. We know we have to bounce back or we will simply fade away like Elvis. And because we are people who value ourselves, we desire the meaning that comes from a good and noble fight, and have staked our claim on being those who raise this civilization from the ashes — but not all of its people, because some or most must go elsewhere — and make it greater than ever before. If you ever wished for meaning and purpose to life, there they are, right within your grasp.

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