Chinese practicality

In the West, we get sticky about anything that involves death or inequality. In Asia, where overpopulation and brutality have been present for far longer, this is not an issue:

A corrupt local planning official with a taste for the high life, Yong solicited money from businessmen eager to expand in China’s economic boom.

But Yong, a portly, bespectacled figure, was caught by the Chinese authorities during a purge on corrupt local officials last year.

But there will be nothing ordinary about Yong’s death by lethal injection. Unless he wins an appeal, he will draw his final breath strapped inside a vehicle that has been specially developed to make executions more cost-effective and efficient.

Inside each ‘death van’ there is a dedicated team of doctors to ‘harvest’ the organs of the deceased. The injections leave the body intact and in pristine condition for such lucrative work.

After checking that the victim is dead, the medical team first remove the eyes. Then, wearing surgical gowns and masks, they remove the kidney, liver, pancreas and lungs.

Little goes to waste, though the heart cannot be used, having been poisoned by the drugs.

The Daily Mail

Western readers are getting ready to masturbate all over themselves with illusions that they are “more civilized” than those rodenty Chinese who kill and harvest just about anything, including each other.

But thinking practically, we’re awash in scumbags and idiots, why not slaughter them and harvest their organs? We have more violent criminals and corrupt officials than good ones here. Their organs could go to people suffering medical maladies, and their removal would be “green” in that fewer resources would be taken up, especially by people with no intent of contribution to society at large.

Go China!

One Comment

  1. Viktor says:

    I love this idea, I do. But, the problem with state controlled killing, is that the STATES CONTROL KILLING.

    it’s only a matter of time before the corruption infects those who decide who dies.

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