Self-hatred comes with success

You scrimp and save, struggle all your life to get ahead, fight hard every day and then some day after decades of battle you wake up and find yourself sitting on a pile of money with no cares in the world.

What do you do then?

The answer for most people is “I don’t know.” When they retire, they have a sudden voice. They’re accustomed to fighting it out at the job. It’s their identity. It keeps them busy. Although they complained about it for the first 30 years, they came to depend on it, so now there’s this huge void.

If you look at wealthier societies worldwide, you can see the same pattern in operation. They struggle for generations to get wealthy and when they do, an anomic misery sets in. There is no longer a purpose to life, it seems, so they try to invent one through empty sex, drinking too much, lots of toys, and importing third-world labor so the original citizens can afford luxuries.

And yet all is in vain. They find no meaning in this because they keep doing it, exhausted and on the other hand seemingly tirelessly, hoping for different results. It’s not that they’re pathological, and expect different results. They simply have no idea what else they would do.

In this we can see the paradox of advanced societies. During those years of struggle, they build up massive intellectual capital, including complex systems of laws and customs for business. Eventually, these so clearly define society that the only variations occur in the details, not at the larger level of making decisions that involve elses.

This leaves the people stranded. The tool has become the master. The game has become the quest. There is no goal, and therefore no meaning, but there are things to uphold. Thousands and thousands of them: laws, appearances, insurance bills, and numerous other complex but unfulfilling tasks. The mania for comfort and security has obliterated the ability to be flexible.

Modern societies make us fat and not lazy so much as emotionally exhausted. We give up on the values that guided us through harder ages. We find nothing to replace them. Coming up with a new goal would endanger the comfort of others, who are still fuzzy about goals but want that security and comfort. They rebel. No one can change anything. The vortex draws us in, and soon we start to exterminate ourselves.

It begins with mild depravities. Just enough fetish and transgression to whet the appetite, then go back to normal life. But others watch, including the next generation. They take it further. Soon it’s not enough to dip your toe in rebellion, but a full on revolution is required. It becomes hip to hate your own society.

Looking over it, you can find few reasons not to hate it. Shopping malls replace churches and forests, cubicle farms replace open communities and history. Values systems die because of their incompatibility with commerce and universal sociability. Cuisine becomes junk food, national pride rooting for a football team, and jobs are jails and home life is even more fractured.

When you replace your souls with the process that was supposed to protect them, you’ve gone to the far side of a cycle. The only solution is to hurry (run don’t walk) back to the start, when a few people came together and agreed to build a massive civilization, and defined their values system as the way they’d accomplish these goals. Then there was meaning. Now there is only self-hatred, until we change it.

11 Comments

  1. NotTheDude says:

    A good friend of mine said that people always want more when I tried to fight the corner of ‘We have enough’. Do many humans reach a state of true contentment? The few I know who do dont go far or have much but the really get involved in their surroundings and what they do have.

    1. 1349 says:

      people always want more

      It’s a mantra of liberal propaganda.
      I bet most people can reach contentment. Give them a task.

      I still wear some of the clothes my father and grandfather wore.

  2. 1349 says:

    [Sighs]

    …What has been said about scientific knowledge
    applies as well: it does not change the human condition, the existential
    situation of an individual, nor does it presuppose or require any
    transformation of that kind. It is rather something added on, superim-
    posed, which does not imply any self-transformation. No one claims
    that we show any real superiority when we are capable of doing this
    or that by availing ourselves of any technical means: we do not cease
    to be mere humans, not even as lords of atomic weapons who can
    disintegrate a planet by pushing a button. And worse yet, if as a
    consequence of any given cataclysm people living in the Kali Yuga
    were deprived of all their machines, in the greatest majority of cases
    they would probably find themselves in a worse predicament than
    uncivilized primitives do when facing the forces of nature and the
    elements. That is because machines and technology have atrophied
    their true strength. We may well say that modern man, by virtue of a
    diabolical mirage, has been seduced by the “power” he has at his
    disposal, and of which he is so very proud.
    That which does not depend on the laws of nature, but which
    rather bends, changes, and suspends them, is a different kind of
    power…

    J.Evola, “The Yoga of Power”

  3. ferret says:

    Coming up with a new goal would endanger the comfort of others, who are still fuzzy about goals but want that security and comfort.

    Perhaps it depends on the goal. One of the goals could be to make these others less fuzzy about goals. Without touching anything else.

  4. Lisa Colorado says:

    So, all of this scrambling for attainment in the world is perhaps another manifestation of self-loathing. If you’re busy trying to strike it rich, you don’t have to sit there with yourself. Then when you do, you’re miles behind.

    1. Lisa Colorado says:

      Because really, living is a wonder and a mystery.

      1. crow says:

        Wonder and Mystery :)
        The real wonder and mystery, is that so many people don’t know that.

  5. ferret says:

    If you look at wealthier societies worldwide, you can see the same pattern in operation.

    If we follow this self-similar, or fractal view, then we can gain a bit of optimism.

    Man experiences happiness in the process of attaining, not when it is done. Perhaps this trait was supported by the evolution so that man would start a new journey towards a new goals.

    If there is a similar pattern at the scale of society, we may expect a new goals will be set providing a feeling of purpose.

  6. Eric says:

    Not that I have not felt this on some level for many years, but it keeps feeling more and more clear to me that so much of the current reality is geared around denial and not needing to actually deal with reality. Unfortunately, as The Police once said, the “truth hits everybody” eventually. How this life and world can have been so much more if in fact we dealt with certain truths in relation to life. But instead we bought denial and escape. That said, I believe sometimes in life we need to head down a dangerous and destructive path to actually see what it is all about. In fact, without doing so we may not actually be able to even see what actually matters in life, because we do not have these negative experiences to compare and contrast to. The irony, both on a personal and group/societal level, is that often things can have gone too far before people actually wake up and realize how wrong they are. And so people grasp for straws to continue the charade – it is almost a defense/self-preservation attempt. And people will go so far as to take others down with them. I guess a twisted form of the survival instinct if you will.

  7. Obadiah 1:18 says:

    That is an extraordinary photo.

    The word “lemmings” comes to mind.

    The words “Let’s move to the country” also come to mind.

  8. Edward says:

    You misspelled ‘wet’ in this paragraph:

    “It begins with mild depravities. Just enough fetish and transgression to whet the appetite, then go back to normal life. But others watch, including the next generation. They take it further. Soon it’s not enough to dip your toe in rebellion, but a full on revolution is required. It becomes hip to hate your own society.”

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