Amerika

Nationalist Public Radio, Episode 3: Copyright Law

Despite our Valentine’s Day being hampered by a lack of Roderick, we went ahead and sat down at the round table to open up a new discussion. In this episode of NPR, Brett, Everitt, and Peter discuss a listener suggested topic: copyright law.

As usual, the highlights can be found below.

0:00 – Introduction of the topic by listener 1349.

1:30 – Everitt’s Intellectual Property Law lecture

  • We are not giving you legal advice – don’t sue us!
  • Origins of copyright law in 1709 and the changes that occurred as production has grown

13:45 – What guides the future of a work? What ought we value?

  • Who owns source material?

18:40 – Peter and Brett discuss cultural appropriation and the world of Sherlock Holmes

  • Peter defends derivative works and critiques the concept of “intellectual theft”
  • Peter also defends plagiarism by critiquing by-lines

24:18 – Everitt and Brett go deeper into cultural appropriation

29:20 – The table discusses the idea of “writing in the same world”

37:00 – Peter expands upon his views on copyright

  • The reader’s interpretation may be just as, if not more important than the author’s intent

41:40 – Government granted ad-hoc monopolies are discussed

44:00 – How ought international scientific cooperation work?

  • Should drugs be patented?

48:00 – Brett discusses who ought to control patents

53:30 – How are we going to enforce copyright laws?

  • We shouldn’t punish individuals with huge fines for pirating a $3 song

57:40 – Peter and Everitt discuss their respective content and paywalls

1:05:40 – What liability ought file sharing sites have?

1:08:35 – Peter confirmed for crypto-Libertarian?!?

1:17:10 – Brett confirmed for open-source nerd

1:18:30 – Any questions can be directed towards podcast@amerika.org

1:18:35 – Closing and Outro

Visit our Nationalist Public Radio Archives to listen to past episodes of the show.

Tags: , , , , ,

|
Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on RedditShare on LinkedIn

Recommended Reading